Rep Susan Davis calls on Navy to assess national threat of border

first_img Posted: April 23, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — San Diego Congresswoman Susan Davis might ask the U.S. Navy to look at border sewage spills that have rankled a wide variety of government, environmental and recreational stakeholders for years.Davis, a Democrat, proposes an assessment of how sewage flow from the Tijuana River might affect construction of a $1 billion Navy SEAL training center proposed for a strip of land south of Silver Strand State Beach.“We know the environmental and economic impact these spills have. What we don’t know, with the Navy planning to stage training operations in potentially contaminated waters, are the national security concerns,” Davis said. “The Navy should take a look at this and coordinate with relevant agencies to assess what can be done to prevent future spills.”Davis, a senior member of the House Armed Services Committee, may include language in this year’s defense bill to commission a Navy report regarding the cumulative tens of millions of gallons of sewage that have sickened people and forced South Bay beach closures.The 600-acre SEAL training campus is estimated to take 10 years to complete, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported. Personnel are expected to gradually migrate from the existing Naval Amphibious Base in Coronado.Davis’ call for a Navy report comes as the Port of San Diego and cities of Chula Vista and Imperial Beach forge ahead with a lawsuit alleging the federal government is violating two U.S. laws that protect water quality and public health. The suit also targets the private operator of a treatment plant that serves Tijuana.Beaches as far north as the Hotel del Coronado have been forced to close as sewage is driven out of Baja into American waters.In 2010, former U.S. Border Patrol agent Josh Willey contracted a flesh-eating bacterial infection while training at the Naval Amphibious Base in Coronado. The infection is thought to be related to sewage spills.The Mexican government announced in March it will invest $4.35 million in upgrades to Tijuana’s wastewater system to reduce sewage flows, but funds fall far short of the approximately $330 million in recommended upgrades outlined by the Baja California government. KUSI Newsroom, Updated: 5:20 PM Rep. Susan Davis calls on Navy to assess national threat of border sewage spillscenter_img April 23, 2018 KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Bad weather alert for Houston

first_img Share Accuweather has activated a significant weather alert  for the South Harris County area and South Houston until 2 p.m.Other areas included are Pasadena, Eastern Pearland, League City, Baytown, Texas City,Friendswood, La Porte, Deer Park, Alvin, Dickinson, La Marque, Santa Fe, Seabrook, Galena Park, Jacinto City, Webster,Hitchcock, Beach City and Kemah.Torrential rainfall is also occurring with the storm, and may leadto localized flooding. last_img

Researchers find first instance of fish larvae making sounds

first_img Explore further Researchers find fish ‘yells’ to be heard over human made noise PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen More information: First evidence of fish larvae producing sounds, Biol. Lett. October 2014 vol. 10 no. 10 20140643. Published 1 October 2014 DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2014.0643AbstractThe acoustic ecology of marine fishes has traditionally focused on adults, while overlooking the early life-history stages. Here, we document the first acoustic recordings of pre-settlement stage grey snapper larvae (Lutjanus griseus). Through a combination of in situ and unprovoked laboratory recordings, we found that L. griseus larvae are acoustically active during the night, producing ‘knock’ and ‘growl’ sounds that are spectrally and temporally similar to those of adults. While the exact function and physiological mechanisms of sound production in fish larvae are unknown, we suggest that these sounds may enable snapper larvae to maintain group cohesion at night when visual cues are reduced. Journal information: Biology Letters © 2014 Phys.org Play “Growl” sounds produced by L. griseus larvae in the field. Credit: Biol. Lett. October 2014 vol. 10 no. 10 20140643 PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreencenter_img Scientists know that adult fish make noise, many fishermen have heard them, also, some have been found to actually “yell” louder to be heard when surrounded by other noise, such as from a boat engine. But, as the research trio point out, few studies have been conducted to learn about the possibly of noise made by young fish or even fish larvae. In their study, they looked at gray snappers (Lutjanus griseus) that live off the coast of Florida.Adult female gray snappers drop their eggs in the open ocean into beds of seagrass—larvae that emerge live off food in the seagrass bed until reaching maturity. To find out if the larvae make noise, the researches put a camera, microphone and lights into a waterproof clear box and dropped it into the sea at night—the lights helped find where the snappers congregated. To make sure the noises they were recording were coming from the larvae, the researchers captured several larvae samples and took them back to their lab where they were recorded in a tank of water. Analysis of the recordings showed the larvae made two kinds of sounds: “knocking” and “growling.” Interestingly, the knocking sound was very similar to the knocking sounds made by adults of the same species. They noted also that the pattern of sounds generated by the larva differed depending on if they were in the open ocean or in the lab tank—in the lab, the larvae produced more sounds per interval and had longer times between them, suggesting perhaps that they were waiting to hear a reply.The researchers can’t say for sure why the larva make noise but suggest it might help the snappers as a whole maintain group cohesion at night when it’s more difficult to see. They suggest the growling sound may be similar to the cries that babies of many species make to get the attention of the adults. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Lutjanus griseus. Credit: Randall, J.E/fishbase.org (Phys.org) —A trio of researchers with the University of Miami has recorded sounds made by fish larvae in both the open ocean and in their lab. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Erica Staaterman, Claire Paris and Andrew Kough describe how they captured the larvae sounds and offer ideas on why they are made. Citation: Researchers find first instance of fish larvae making sounds (2014, October 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-10-instance-fish-larvae.html Play “Knock” sounds produced by L. griseus larvae in the field. Credit: Biol. Lett. October 2014 vol. 10 no. 10 20140643 last_img read more

Kids with rich vocab shine in school

first_imgKids with larger oral vocabularies are better behaved and are also likely to perform well in school, new research has found.Other research has found that children who do better academically in kindergarten are more likely to go to college, get married, own homes and live in higher-income households.“Our findings provide compelling evidence for oral vocabulary’s theorised importance as a multifaceted contributor to children’s early development,” said lead researcher Paul Morgan, associate professor of education policy studies at Pennsylvania State University in the US. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The researchers examined data from parental surveys reporting on the size of their children’s vocabularies at two years of age. The researchers found that vocabulary gaps between groups of children were already evident by this early time period. Females, those from more economically advantaged families, and those receiving higher quality parenting had larger oral vocabularies. Children born with low birth weight or who were being raised by mothers with health problems had smaller vocabularies.When the researchers looked at how the children were doing three years later in kindergarten, they found that children with larger vocabularies at two years of age were better readers, knew more about mathematics, were more attentive and task persistent, and were less likely to engage in acting out- or anxious-type behaviours. The findings appeared in the journal Child Development.last_img read more

Hyundai escooter charges when mounted to your car

first_imgHyundai has dropped a few more eggs in the last-mile electric mobility basket, today unveiling a redesigned prototype scooter to propel folks over the final leg of their journey. The electric two-wheeler packs more than enough range to complete short hops between urban destinations, and can even draw power from the owner’s car to stay topped up and ready to roll.Hyundai’s newly unveiled scooter actually builds on an earlier prototype unveiled at CES in 2017. In the time since, its engineers have shifted from a front-wheel drive to rear-wheel drive in the interests of safety, and also added suspension to the front end to smooth out the ride.Powered by a 10.5-Ah onboard lithium battery, the scooter can reach a top speed of 20 km/h (12.4 mph) and travel 20 km on each charge. Conveniently, it is also designed to mount to Hyundai and Kia vehicles, where it can be charged using electricity produced as the car drives. AllMedX AllMedX Find out about dolutegravir for HIV treatment on AllMedx.com. AllMedX Yes No I consent to the use of Google Analytics and related cookies across the TrendMD network (widget, website, blog). Learn more We recommend AllMedX HIV treatment as prevention: Get the latest evidence on AllMedx.com. Google Analytics settings AllMedX Review the data for rapid HIV testing on AllMedx.com. HIV antiretroviral therapy research updates: Get the latest on AllMedx.com Dolutegravir/lamivudine prescribing information is on AllMedx.com. Read the details. Hyundai’s scooter features a tri-folding design and a total weight of 7.7 kg (16.9 lb)Hyundai Source: Hyundai Should the owner need to transport it by foot, however, the scooter does feature a tri-folding design and a total weight of 7.7 kg (16.9 lb), so it can also be carted around under an arm if need be. Other features include front and rear lights and a digital display for tracking battery levels and speed, while Hyundai says it is also developing a regenerative braking system that could increase the range by seven percent.The scooter remains a developmental prototype for now with no word of a commercial version just yet, but you can see the latest iteration do its thing in the video below. Does HIV antiretroviral therapy cause weight gain? Review the clinical studies on AllMedx.com Privacy policy AllMedX Powered by Last mile mobility for the future, Hyundai·Kia ‘Vehicle-mounted electric scooter’ revealedlast_img read more