Junior Lone Star Ends Rio Olympic Journey

first_imgLiberia experienced her second worst defeat on Saturday in three years when Ghana’s Black Meteors defeated Junior Lone Star 5-1 to qualify for the second phase in the CAF U-23 Championship on a 7-1 aggregate at the Tamale Sports Stadium in Ghana.It was the return leg, after Junior Lone Star lost 2-0 in the first leg which was also played in Ghana due to the Ebola situation in Liberia.Kotoko forward Dauda Mohammed, Baba Mensah, Sadiq Alhassan and Tamimu Montari all got their names on the score sheet.Cooper Gypia scored Liberia’s consolation goal.Ghana will now face DR Congo in the next round.It may be recalled that Liberia got her first worst defeat in October 2012, when the Super Eagles of Nigeria defeated Lone Star 6-1 to qualify for the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations 8-3 on aggregate.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

San Jose Sharks fans: Smoking Pig, Opa! and Sushi Confidential join SAP Center food lineup

first_imgChomp takes on new meaning this season as the San Jose Sharks, SAP Center and their culinary partner, Aramark, unveil a new lineup of food choices for hockey fans.There’s lots to sample. Good thing it’s a sport with two intermissions.Three popular, locally owned restaurants — Smoking Pig BBQ, Opa! and Sushi Confidential — have joined the selection on the SAP Concourse Level, along with several other fan favorites. The Test Launch Kitchen, which features a rotating series of experimental …last_img

Good evening, sister and brother propagandists

first_imgGood evening, sister and brother propagandists.What did she just call us, I hear you asking yourselves? Us? Propagandists?A hundred years ago, there would have been no shame attached to being called a propagandist. The word propaganda had not yet been hijacked by the enemies of democracy. In some parts of the world, notably Latin America, propaganda still has a neutral sense. There it refers to commercial advertising.Edward Bernays, the friend of Sigmund Freud who is considered by many to have been the father of public relations, was happy to call his art propaganda. He thought it was an important component of democracy. He even titled his groundbreaking 1928 book on PR “Propaganda”.Propaganda is a Latin word. It means “things that need to propagated or disseminated”. One the reason eggs and bacon is today synonymous with breakfast is that Bernays successfully propagated the idea that eggs and bacon were a healthy way to start the day.He did that by getting a segment of society that commands universal respect – the medical profession – to endorse the benefits of a hearty breakfast. Then he promoted eggs and bacon as the quintessential hearty breakfast. This was before the discovery of cholesterol.Gathered here this evening are some of the most talented practitioners of the art of propagating ideas in the world. And while you represent a great and diverse array of clients and interests, one of the most compelling questions that challenges all of us is: how can we do for Africa what Edward Bernays did for bacon and eggs?How do we propagate the idea that Africa is an appetising, energising and essential part of the world’s day?The basic ingredients are coming together and the product is perhaps more saleable than it has ever been. Late last year, the World Bank reported that 2005 “may well have been the year when Africa turned the corner” unquote from poverty and debt to prosperity and wealth.Economic growth is picking up steam all over the continent. A growing number of countries, among them Senegal, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Uganda and Ghana, is on course to cut poverty in half by 2010. Primary school enrollment and literacy rates are rising. In many countries, infant mortality is down. Macroeconomic indicators are improving, with inflation falling to historic lows, currencies stabilizing and fiscal deficits dropping, and foreign direct investment surging.Democratic transfers of power are now the norm and the African Union is starting to stand fast against member governments who come to power through unconstitutional means. African conflicts may still grab headlines, but the truth is they are dwindling in number, largely as a result of the efforts of Africans themselves. And, having overtaken the Middle East as America’s largest source of oil imports, Africa is assuming unprecedented strategic importance.Too little of this gets projected to the world at large. To the contrary, in the popular culture of the North, Africa remains a source of horror and pity. Consider Hollywood’s latest contribution. This year, two Oscar contenders painted Africa in the direst imaginable colors.One, the Last King of Scotland, depicted the bloody rule of Idi Amin in stomach-turning detail. The other, Blood Diamonds, dealt graphically with the civil war in Sierra Leone, limb-severings and all.The conflict in Sierra Leone is now over. Peace has been achieved. Idi Amin is long gone and Uganda has for years been seen as a model of post-conflict reconstruction and is now one of the fastest-growing economies in the world. But the distinction between past and present has also most certainly been lost on most filmgoers in the North.Last year, of course, an African film made by Africans about Africa actually won an Oscar. But as justifiably proud as we were of Tsotsi’s success, its images were not ones we would necessarily have chosen to have seared into the minds of international audiences.All these films deserve the accolades they’ve been getting as examples of the filmmaker’s art, but we have to be aware of how they feed pernicious stereotypes. In the same way, just we have to be aware of the messages cherished celebrities send when they come to Africa bearing gifts and professing love and compassion. Unwittingly or not, they tend to nourish the assumption that Africans are victims and incapable of looking after their own.This assumption is also fed by the media. This is not because the media is malicious. Actually, the journalists who cover Africa for the world’s newspapers, radio and television are generally caring human beings with a strong regard for truth.Most of them didn’t become journalists to fatten their bank accounts. Many entered their profession because they wanted to shine a light on what is wrong with the world with a view to helping get it fixed.That being the case, reporters and their editors are not going to spend a lot of time covering things that are working. The fact that South Africa has the lowest cost electricity in the world is not news. Power failures are.By the same token, reporters are going to spend a lot of time with, and give voice to, people they see working to get things fixed. That is part of the reason NGO’s like Oxfam and Global Witness and Doctors Without Borders tend to be the primary sources for stories out of Africa. Another part is the reason is the journalists have a hard-wired distrust of authority, which is a good thing for democracy.A lot of NGO’s do terrific and necessary work and make a genuine difference in people’s lives. But it’s a fact of life that they have to compete for resources to do their work, which leads, quite naturally, to their marketing the problems they seek to address. This marketing tends to drown out other more hopeful narratives about Africa and plays straight into Afropessimism.How, in the face of all this, are we going to re-brand Africa?One way we are not going to do it, is by assuming an angry and defensive attitude and attacking messengers, challenging their bona fides and being perpetually thin-skinned about criticism. All that will do is reinforce stereotypes.The only media that consistently reports “good news” is the media in closed societies and closed societies tend to be the least successful in today’s world. We might do worse than to learn from the American cognitive linguist George Lakoff and what he has been trying to teach his country’s Democratic Party about framing its message to voters. In his book, “Don’t Think of an Elephant”, Lakoff makes the simple point that if you ask someone not to think of an elephant, an elephant is precisely what will leap into that person’s mind.What this means is that when we talk to the world and tell it our story, we must use our own frame of reference, not the frame supplied by Afropessimism or existing stereotypes. If we start out defensively by confronting the Afropessimist or stereotypical viewpoint directly, we have conceded control of the frame.Take the example of crime in this country. Government is talking about this issue in a reactive and defensive way, using the frame supplied by its critics. It needs to establish it own frame, a frame that gives people a sense of hope that crime is a problem that can, and will be dealt with. Instead we need to create a vision for what a safe, secure and successful country will resemble.A good example of the approach I’m talking about is an article that appeared in the Financial Times last year by Jim Sutcliffe, the CEO of Old Mutual. He was worried about the way BEE was being seen by foreign investors. But instead of beginning his article by mentioning investor concerns, he created his own frame. Here’s how the article began:“South Africa’s drive to bring the long excluded majority of its people into the mainstream of its economic life is paying healthy dividends. It is pushing the growth rate – nearly 5 per cent in 2005 – onto a higher trajectory. It has helped the 12-year-old democracy move ahead of India as a destination for foreign direct investment. And it was a factor in the 47% total return on equities traded on the JSE last year.Broadly defined, the black economic empowerment (BEE) strategy hammered out between government and business is helping fuel an economic and social revolution as millions of South Africans start to enjoy disposable income and upward mobility for the first time in their lives. This is making South Africa both an exciting place to do business and one that holds the promise of long-term stability.How real is the transformation? Consider this. Just over 20 years ago, South Africa’s most famous newspaper, the Rand Daily Mail, closed because its readership was increasingly black and of no interest to advertisers. Today, South Africa’s most successful newspaper is the Daily Sun, a three-year-old start-up targeted at the black working class. Its circulation is 450 000 and rising and advertisers are clamoring for space on its pages.”This is a great example of how we can all work to redefine Africa in the minds of the world. It’s about telling our story on our terms – and telling it truthfully and without trying to pretend that everything is perfect. Sutcliffe did go on to respond to concerns investors have about BEE, but not before establishing a whole new way of looking at the subject – a new frame — as a reason to invest and have faith in South Africa’s future.Importantly, he told a concrete and unexpected story – the extraordinary success of the Daily Sun — to illustrate his case and help readers see South Africa in a new way.This is the way we have to start talking about our continent as a whole – as a region ripe with opportunity, a market 800 million strong, rich in resources, human and natural, and with huge pent up demand for goods and services. In short a great new frontier. Having established this frame, we can then build its credibility by being totally candid about the problems we still face.Above all, we need to be armed with gripping stories that stick in people’s minds. The way we perceive the world is shaped strongly by anecdote, and the more memorable stories we can tell that defy stereotype and illustrate the strengths and capacities of our continent’s people, the more we will change mindsets. The more we demonstrate a country Alive With Possibility”, the more we will create Afro Optimism.There are great stories to tell, if we’re willing to look for them and encourage people to tell. Story gathering is something we can’t simply leave to the media which, for the reasons I’ve outlined, are not focused on our kind of story. There are or course exceptions, like the American filmmaker Carol Pineau, whose documentary, “Africa Open for Business”, has been winning prizes and accolades around the world. In this film, Carol introduces to the world an extraordinary array entrepreneurs, from Pierre Sauvalle, founder and artistic director of Senegal-based Pictoon, the only animation design studio in Africa that produces television series and feature films, to-Adenike Ogunlesi, who owns and operates the “in” label in Nigeria in children’s clothes, Ruff ‘N’ Tumble, to Mohammed Yassin Olad, who runs a thriving airline in the truly business environment of Somalia. She has another film on the same theme now in the works. We must do all we can to encourage this kind of work.Ultimately, as the article by Jim Sutcliffe and Edward Bernays with his pro-hearty breakfast doctors showed, very little beats credible third-party endorsers when it comes to selling a product or propagating an idea.We need to get what Simon Gladwell has called the mavens, the connectors and the persuaders – the key players in dramatic shifts of public perception – to propagate the idea of Africa as the opportunity continent. This is a process about which there is a great deal of expertise in this room tonight. I am confident that we are close to the tipping point. Africa is on the move. Yes, there are huge challenges still to be confronted, and yes, movement is by no means uniform. But many of the challenges are really opportunities, if properly viewed and properly framed.That is an idea Ogilvy and its supremely talented people can to much to propagate, and in fact, have a responsibility to do so.last_img read more

Rebellion and celebration in Mali’s music

first_imgCD Anderson “A sometimes harrowing documentary charting the aftermath of a ban on music-making in northern Mali” (Image: https://t.co/Z3qb6G174e ) pic.twitter.com/PD2ZtiBAQ9— CD Anderson (@bizarrojerri) September 21, 2016Due to popular demand and global critical acclaim, the 2015 feature documentary They Will Have to Kill Us First, which follows exiled Malian musicians returning home to challenge artistic censorship by religious extremism in the country, is now available to watch online, exclusively through Amazon’s pay-per-view streaming service.The specially commissioned soundtrack, with some of Mali’s legendary musical acts and rebellious upstarts, is also now officially available to buy online.Directed by UK-based Johanna Schwartz and produced by renowned documentarian André Singer, They Will Have to Kill Us First documents the aftermath of the Islamic extremist takeover of northern Mali in 2012. The extremists enforced a strict variant of Sharia, Islamic law, banning all forms of music and music-making.The film uses interviews with leading Malian musicians and archive material to show what happened: Radio stations were closed; instruments were burned and musicians were arrested and detained or forced into exile. They either went to the south of Mali or to neighbouring countries.Rather than laying down their instruments, the exiles decided to fight back. The end of the documentary explores the musicians honouring their African cultural heritage and identity as they prepare for a defiant homecoming concert in Timbuktu.Mixing traditional styles and instruments with Western genres, such as rock, funk and hip-hop, into a unique and mesmerising Malian sound, the music is a potent concoction of rebellion, celebration and affirmation.Tinariwen is a Grammy Award-winning group of Tuareg musicians from the Sahara Desert region of northern Mali. (Wikipedia) pic.twitter.com/g9FzVIrfv7— CD Anderson (@bizarrojerri) September 21, 2016One of the more globally renowned Malian groups is Tinariwen, an evolving collective of singers, songwriters and musicians from the nomadic Berber and Tuareg tribes, whose rich and sacred musical heritage fuses mesmeric desert guitar music over naturalistic ambiance.Other well-known artists from Mali include the Touré musical dynasty – late father Ali Farka and son Vieux – who spread the distinctive guitar-based African folk blues sound around the globe. Kora player Toumani Diabaté cross-pollinates traditional African rhythms with diverse global pop music, including flamenco, American blues and electronica. Salif Keita, the legendary “golden voice of Africa”, made Afro-pop and world music popular in Europe during the 1980s and 1990s.Amkoullel, Malian hip-hop star and activist (Image: https://t.co/Z3qb6G174e ) pic.twitter.com/LTb5E5Pmls— CD Anderson (@bizarrojerri) September 21, 2016Malian hip-hop star Amkoullel, who features prominently in They Will Have to Kill Us First, combines the heady mix of political and social fervour in his French and indigenous language lyrics with skewed, modernised traditional sounds. His popular song SOS is a rallying call to young Malians to stand up for their rights in the face of corruption and extremism. Since 2012, Amkoullel has been a proponent of the anti-government, anti-extremism movement Plus jamais ça (Never again this). It calls on the Malian government to “take a stand against violence to the constitution and democracy”.Khaira Arby is the reigning queen of song in Timbuktu, known as the “nightingale of the north” (Image: https://t.co/Z3qb6G174e ) pic.twitter.com/1MgaiC9UMw— CD Anderson (@bizarrojerri) September 21, 2016The beloved “nightingale of the north”, singer Khaira Arby, organiser of the Timbuktu concert, has been a national cultural treasure in Mali for over four decades. In the documentary, she speaks passionately about her art and the role it plays in regaining freedom in her country. “(In Mali)… it’s not life without music.”Her music, indigenous lyrics over hypnotic desert blues, highlights gender issues in Malian society, particularly violence against women, genital mutilation and the effects of war, asking, in the poignant but groovy Goumou: “Why, in a country of beautiful women, do men go to war?”Songhoy Blues is a desert punk / blues music group from Timbuktu, Mali. (Image: https://t.co/Z3qb6G174e) pic.twitter.com/lNYInVAIqq— CD Anderson (@bizarrojerri) September 21, 2016A particular highlight of They Will Have to Kill Us First is the band Songhoy Blues, a group born in the wake of the Sharia oppression. Its four members met in exile in the south of the country. The band mixes rebellious punk rock with more traditional desert blues that, the band hopes, “recreate(s) that lost ambience of the north and make(s) all the refugees relive those northern songs”.Discovered in 2013 by British pop singer-songwriter and record producer Damon Albarn on the streets of the Malian capital Bamako, Songhoy Blues became the first African group in more than 40 years to sign to the Atlantic record label.They are currently one of the hippest bands on tour across the US and Europe, playing festivals such as Glastonbury, Bonnaroo and Roskilde. Songhoy Blues uses these stages to bring Mali’s story to the world in songs such asSoubour, a stomping guitar groove that mixes political commentary with an environmental message.Other artists featured in the documentary include the desert blues duo Disco and Jimmy, guitarist Moussa Sidi and archive performances by Ali Farka Touré and Tinariwen.During the film’s first theatrical run, early in 2015, it was selected for over 20 international film festivals, including SXSW, London and Durban international film festivals. It is also one of a few documentaries that has scored a perfect 100% rating on the user-generated Rotten Tomatoes review website.Acclaim has been positive across the board. Critics praise its honesty and emotional heft. The Austin Chronicle, reviewing the film at the SXSW festival, called it “social journalism of the highest order… also one of the most vibrantly shot and masterfully edited documentaries…”CBS Radio said the film was both disturbing and inspiring, adding that it was “an excellent and important (film)”.Source: They Will Have to Kill Us FirstWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SouthAfrica.info materiallast_img read more

How to Start a Mastermind Group

first_imgIt’s been said that you will become the composite of the books you read and the five people with whom you spend the most time. If you study the concept of memetics, the way ideas spread from person to person, you’ll find evidence to support this assertion. Even without any validation, anyone who has a mastermind group will tell you how important it has been to their growth, their development, and their success.A good mastermind group will help you see how much potential you have, allow you to share best practices and strategies, provide a sense of camaraderie, and create a sense of personal accountability. I don’t want to extol the virtues here, but rather share with you how you start one.The WhoIt’s essential that you find people who are growth-oriented for a mastermind. The people in your mastermind must be driven to be more, do more, have more, and contribute more (my shorthand for striving to reach your full potential). It isn’t enough that they want the camaraderie alone. They need to bring something to the table. You can’t build an effective mastermind with people who aren’t striving, or who are merely drifting.You also want to find people who have a powerful locus of control, people who believe that they are acting on the world, not allowing the world to work on them. You will be able to identify these people by the fact that they always have projects followed by more projects. A mastermind is a collection of people who are empowered, intrinsically motivated and driven.The people you invite into a mastermind must also be willing to share and teach. There are some people possessed by a scarcity mindset. They are not willing to share because your success might diminish their success. You need people who are confident that sharing with you will help you improve, and your sharing with them will benefit them.I have described myself as a scientist. I try things to see if I can make them work. It’s good to have people who try things and measure the results in your mastermind. The more experiments your mastermind members are running, the more insights you can share.An excellent and effective mastermind requires the trust that you can share your successes and your failures, both of which provide lessons and feedback. You can’t share things like your financial results if you don’t trust the people in your mastermind group. You can’t share your strategies and tactics with people who won’t respect what you have shared in confidence. You have to be able to share and to be transparent, especially around your challenges.The WhatA good mastermind has frequent, but not too-frequent, meetings, always with an agenda. Like any useful meeting, you need to prepare your thoughts, ideas, challenges, opportunities, and questions. Starting the session with a primary question to answer is one way to get the most out of each meeting. You are going to leave with takeaways, and you’ll need time to gather feedback before the next meeting.Your mastermind will invariably share strategies with which you are unfamiliar but equally important will be their network. They will know people who can help you, providing you with referrals for service providers you might need, or referrals and introductions to people who need your services. You will know people and have relationships that will benefit them as well.What might be the most useful outcome of belonging to a mastermind group is being challenged by your peers. Your mastermind members will have different ideas and different opinions, all shaped by their different experiences, biases, and preferences. You will find the most value in being challenged to look at what you’re doing through a different lens.Interview Potential MembersYou are going to want to interview potential members for fit. You have to want to spend time with the members of your group. The more you like and respect the members of your mastermind group, the higher the odds of you helping everyone in the group to grow towards their full potential. Spend time together, and see if there is chemistry.Explore what they are reading, as non-readers don’t often make the best members. Ask questions about the new things they are trying in their life and in their business to test for their desire to improve and determine their motivation. You also want people who spend time thinking. People who write—even if they write for themselves—often make good mastermind group members.You don’t want more than six people in your group unless you are part of a moderated mastermind group. You need time to share, and larger groups tend to be more unwieldy.“But wait,” you say. “I am a salesperson or sales manager, not an entrepreneur. Can I start a mastermind of salespeople or sales managers?” Not only is it true that you can start a mastermind, but you should also do so with great haste.If you want to improve your performance, a group of people dedicated to doing so and sharing their experience will accelerate your growth. Start a mastermind.last_img read more

Nishikori falters against Chung in all-Asian match in Paris

first_imgPalace: Duterte to hear out security execs on alleged China control of NGCP Holloway stops Aldo in 3rd, wins UFC featherweight belt Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Japan’s Kei Nishikori breaks his racket in his third round match of the French Open tennis tournament against Korea’s Hyeon Chung at the Roland Garros stadium, in Paris, France. Saturday, June 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)PARIS — Hyeon Chung fought back from two sets down against Kei Nishikori to keep alive his bid to become the first South Korean to reach the fourth round of the French Open.Nishikori was leading 7-5, 6-4, 6-7 (4), 0-3 when rain stopped play on Saturday. The match will resume Sunday.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES It is the first time in the Open era two Asian men have met as late as the third round in a Grand Slam tournament.Chung has never beaten a top-10 player in six attempts.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutBut he was making the eighth-seeded Nishikori, the first Asian man to contest a Grand Slam final at the 2014 U.S. Open, look ordinary.Nishikori had to save a set point in the first set. In the second, the Japanese star appeared to have problems with the same right wrist he had treatment on in his second-round win over Jeremy Chardy. But he prevailed, and appeared on course for a straight-sets victory in his first meeting with Chung. Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PARcenter_img Every 18 seconds someone is diagnosed with HIV Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast BSP survey: PH banks see bright horizon amid dark global recession clouds BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast However, Chung took the third set in a tiebreaker, bringing up set point with a backhand down the line and clinching it when Nishikori hit long.Chung broke twice at the start of the fourth set, prompting Nishikori to hurl his racket to the clay in disgust, and breaking it.Nishikori had treatment on his back, and shortly after the rain started.Chung began playing tennis with his parents at 6, and continued when a doctor recommended that looking at the color green helped his weak eyesight. ATP players voted him the most improved player in 2015.In April, he reached the Barcelona quarterfinals as a qualifier, and in May he made his first ATP semifinals in Munich.ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more