Kyran Bracken urges you to stop smoking

first_imgAll of those who want to stub out smoking for good will receive daily support and encouragement via:A Stoptober app (available via Smartphone)A Facebook pageA Stoptober support packAs well as the financial benefits of stopping smoking, those undertaking the 28 day programme will experience physical improvements including clearer and brighter looking skin, a better sense of smell and taste and more energy.Longer term, those who stop smoking reduce their risk of heart disease and lung cancer as well as protecting others from their secondhand smoke. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Health concerns: Smoking affects your everyday life, including your bank balance!FORMER ENGLAND scrum-half Kyran Bracken is supporting Stoptober – the Department of Health’s first ever mass attempt to get the nation to stop smoking.The new campaign encourages quitters to stay smokefree across October, supporting them across their areas of expertise  – Health, Wealth and Self – with top tips and advice.We know that if you can stop smoking for 28 days you are five times more likely to stay smokefree and Stoptober will guide smokers through a detailed step-by-step programme to help them achieve this goal.“As a former professional sportsman, I can thoroughly endorse this campaign. Smoking dramatically hampers your physical ability and your general wellbeing,” says the former Saracens player. “For the sake of your own health and sporting ambitions, I urge you to all take part in Stoptober and stop smoking. You can do it!”Famous faces – including Gordon Ramsay, Jeff Brazier and Sharron Davies – employers, councils and local stop smoking services will also be supporting the brand new stop smoking campaign.center_img Smoking is the biggest cause of premature death in England and each year it accounts for over 100,000 deaths in the UK and one in two long-term smokers will die prematurely from a smoking disease.For more information and to join the biggest stop smoking challenge of its kind, visit smokefree.nhs.uk/Stoptober.last_img read more

RBS 6 Nations: French search for the perfect 10

first_img Stumbling blocks: France No 10 Freddie Michalak is stopped in his tracks by England’s half-backs at TwickenhamBy Gavin Mortimer “IF YOU any good ideas, give them to me,” said Philippe Saint-Andre in the aftermath of Saturday’s Six Nations defeat to England. The coach of France was responding to a question from a French journalist about the search for a No 10, the problem position for the Blues for the last couple of seasons. Actually, it’s been France’s problem position for years, decades, even. The evidence? Look at the all-time list of Test top points scorers – not one Frenchman in the top 20, the only nation from the Big Ten not represented.Plan B: Trinh-Duc was hauled off after 52 minsIt’s the view of Saint-Andre – and many others within French rugby – that there are too many foreign fly-halves in the Top 14 and it’s because of their presence that Les Bleus can’t find an international standard No 10. “Jonny Wilkinson, I can’t [select],” he complained to the French press on Sunday. “[Luke] McAllister neither. [Johnny] Sexton will be at Racing Metro next season so I can’t look there…” So that’s three clubs. What about the other 11? In fact last weekend, as Frederic Michalak and Francois Trinh-Duc were falling short against England, there were ten French fly-halves on show in the Top 14. So much for Saint-Andre’s theory.The likes of Clermont’s David Skrela and Lionel Beauxis of Toulouse have been capped many times by France, but never quite made the grade, while players such as Benat Arrayet of Mont-de-Marsan and Castres’ Rémy Tales are good solid professionals who have never had that little bit of star dust quality needed for Test rugby.But three of the fly-halves are youngsters, stars of recent France U20 sides, and tipped for great things when still in their teens. Yann Lesgourgues made his Heineken Cup debut for Biarritz against Gloucester in January 2010, when he was still only 18, while Jules Plisson, the 21-year-old Stade Francais fly-half, played in the recent junior world championship. So, too, Mathieu Ugalde, the 20-year-old who’ll be learning a great deal playing outside Mike Phillips at Bayonne.These three players have got the talent, and they’re being given the opportunity at their respective clubs, just as 21-year-old Owen Farrell has at Saracens, 23-year-old Dan Biggar at the Ospreys or 21-year-old Duncan Weir at Glasgow. What it will come down to, ultimately, is whether these young Frenchmen have the right temperament. And therein lies the real problem for Saint-Andre. NOT FOR FEATURED So it’s not the lack of French qualified fly-halves that is the problem for Saint-Andre; it’s the fact most of them in recent times have had the temperament of a ten-year-old.Follow Gavin Mortimer on Twitter @gavinmortimer7 The dearth of decent French fly-halves is a conundrum that stretches back to the mid-1990s and the retirement of Thierry Lacroix, the last really reliable No 10 to wear the cockerel on his chest. Since then we’ve watched countless French fly-halves flatter to deceive: Thomas Castaignede, Christophe Lamaison, Yann Delaigue, Gerald Merceron, Francois Gelez, Michalak, Beauxis, Skrela, Trinh-Duc.Chart-topper: Christophe LamaisonLamaison, incidentally, is France’s record points scorer. Guess how many? 380.Yet in the same era France has produced four scrum-halves of world-class quality. Think Fabien Galthie, Jean-Baptiste Élissalde, Dimitri Yachvili and Morgan Parra, all brilliant players, decisive leaders and all, with the exception of Galthie, goal-kickers. Is this another reason for the lack of quality fly-halves in France? The strong characters of their scrum-halves, allied to their goal-kicking skills, have combined to undermine the role of the fly-half and to weaken his influence on the game.It’s just a wee theory, but one I believe in even more after watching Perpignan play Stade Francais last Saturday. In the final quarter of the game Stade were awarded a penalty slap bang in front of the posts, and captain David Lyons told Plisson to take the three points. Plisson wanted to kick to the corner and go for a seven-pointer but his captain was adamant – take the three points. Plisson petulantly teed up the ball, sulkily swung his boot and sliced his kick wide. As Plisson later admitted it was a miss that would have shamed a “schoolboy”. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

EXCLUSIVE COLUMN: Stephen Moore

first_img No fading to Black: Stephen Moore was part of an improved Oz side that lost to New Zealand in third Bledisloe matchBy Stephen MooreSO FAR this year we’ve played the top teams in the world – the Lions, New Zealand, South Africa and Argentina – and it’s not going to get any easier in Europe next month. We’ll have to play our best rugby to get a result.Ewen McKenzie has a fresh set of ideas and it’s been good so far, although results have been a little disappointing. The scrum has been an issue and we need to sort it out. We’ve not handled the new laws as well as we need to.Ewen’s also brought a new approach to the way we attack. He wants to play an attractive style so people come to watch, but we need wins as well. It’s about getting the balance between an attractive style and taking more risks, and ultimately making sure we win games.We’ve got an extra Bledisloe Cup Test in New Zealand this month and then a five-game northern hemisphere tour in November. I really enjoy playing up there – the stadiums are wonderful and the crowds are very supportive of rugby.We’re doing a Grand Slam tour again. I remember the one in 2009 when Brian O’Driscoll scored a try very late in the game to draw that Test and then we went down to Scotland. It was a difficult two-week period, but we have another opportunity to try to achieve that now. We’ll focus on getting a good start and building confidence as the tour goes on. Moment of magic: Brian O’Driscoll scored late on in 2009We play England first and Australia have a great rivalry with them – not just in rugby. The boys get really into that game, particularly at Twickenham, which is probably my favourite ground in the world. It has a great atmosphere and I’ve been fortunate to have success there.Last year we lost to France at the start but bounced back against England. Any Test win away from home is special and that is a memorable win, a performance that all the guys remember fondly.We’re playing the northern hemisphere guys in their backyard two years out from the World Cup and it’ll be a good indication of where teams are at. They will see this as a real opportunity to get a win over a southern hemisphere team so the expectation will be on us to perform. DUBLIN, IRELAND – NOVEMBER 15: Brian O’ Driscoll of Ireland runs at the Australia defence during the Rugby Union International between Ireland and Australia at Croke Park on November 15, 2009 in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS England are improving and beat the All Blacks last year so we know that will be a formidable challenge. Wales have been a good side for a long time and their Lions players will be driving them forward. Scotland beat us in Australia the last time we played and at Murrayfield in 2009, so we know they’re a very hard side to turn over.I’ve not seen much of Ireland of late, but I always enjoy playing there and it’ll be a new experience at the Aviva Stadium. My parents are Irish so hopefully I’ll get the chance to visit relatives there – I just struggle to find enough tickets for them all. One time I got everyone tickets in the Wallabies’ area and they turned up in Ireland jerseys and scarves! This time I might have to consider only giving them tickets if they’ll wear a Wallabies shirt.last_img read more

What next for France?

first_imgFrance’s players react at the end of the rugby union test match France vs South Africa at the Stade de France in Saint Denis, Paris’ suburb, on November 23, 2013. AFP PHOTO / LIONEL BONAVENTURE (Photo credit should read LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS However, the thought of relegation to Pro2 keeps club presidents awake at night. Additionally, British and Irish fans often fail to appreciate the parochialism in the French game where local bragging rights count for far more than beating the best Europe has to offer.The question that was at the heart of Midi Olympique’s editorial on Monday was “What do we aspire to?” It’s a question that the FFR and the LNR have been discussing for the best part of the year, ever since France collected their first Six Nations wooden spoon in 14 years. But nothing has been resolved, and now comes the latest stand-off over Europe, with LNR president Paul Goze yet to respond to the FFR’s declaration on Thursday that French clubs will participate in next season’s Heineken Cup. MO’s Verdier confessed he was frightened that the Top 14 will win out, to the detriment of the national team, who are destined to become increasingly “insignificant” in the seasons to come.Needing answers: France after the loss to the SpringboksThat might not transpire if the French team can return to winning ways but for that to happen risks need to be taken, by both the clubs in their playing style and Philippe Saint-Andre in his team selection. He could start by picking Geoffrey Palis as his full-back for the Six Nations. The 22-year-old Castres player scored all of his side’s points in their 20-16 win away at Montpellier on Saturday – the first time Montpellier have been beaten at home in the league this season – and he’s also a fast, creative and intelligent footballer. Dumbfounded: Thierry Dusautoir looks bereft of ideas after France fell to South Africa 19-10 at the weekendBy Gavin MortimerWhat are we going to do about France? What is France going to do about Philippe Saint-Andre?Two years since he took over from Marc Lievremont, the former Gloucester and Sale coach has presided over the worst calendar year of the French team in modern history. Two wins from 11 matches is an appalling indictment of Saint-Andre’s two years in charge, particularly when the victories were against Tonga and Scotland, both third tier nations.France likes to think of itself as a first tier nation but as Jacques Verdier, editor of Midi Olympique, wrote on Monday, that status is now under threat. That was confirmed a few hours later when the latest IRB rankings saw France drop a place to sixth, behind Wales, England and the Southern Hemisphere’s big three.Got any bright ideas, Philippe?: A bemused Saint-AndreVerdier was scathing in his assessment of France’s deficiencies, wringing his hands in frustration at what his country have become. What has happened to our traditional strengths, he cried: “Our capacity to adapt, the timing and placing of our passes, our taste for risk and creation.”Bernard Laporte, director of rugby at Toulon and the man who coached France to World Cup semi-finals in 2003 and 2007, was asked that question on a radio show last week. He blamed the Top 14, saying the French championship placed too much emphasis on negative, defensive rugby. He’s right. On its day, the Top 14 can produce compelling rugby, but it can also throw up games so sterile and risk-averse that by half time one almost loses the will to live. Why? Because so much is at stake in the Top 14, financially. That’s why French clubs perform better in Europe, because they can play without pressure. A poor Heineken Cup campaign won’t have serious financial ramifications for the French clubs (especially when the Top 14 announces next month what is expected to be a monstrous broadcasting deal). Selecting Palis as his goal-kicking full-back would allow Saint-Andre greater freedom in his choice of half-backs. The Morgan Parra/Remi Tales axis failed to fire over the three autumn internationals, and it’s time Saint-Andre gave Montpellier’s Jonathan Pelissie an opportunity to show what he can do at scrum-half rather than carry on with Parra – who faces three months on the sidelines with a knee injury anyway – simply because he’s a goal-kicker. Partner Pelissie with Perpignan’s Camille Lopez, move Brice Dulin from full-back to wing, along with Sofiane Guitoune on the other flank, and pair Wesley Fofana with Gael Fickou in the midfield. Suddenly France have an ambitious and exciting backline with an average age of just 23.Go on, Saint-Andre do it, it may be the only way to stop France slipping further down those rankings.last_img read more

Wales: Five things we’ve learnt – May

first_img Probables v Possibles was a success.Many may question the on-field benefits of the Probables v Possibles fixture – however the off-field benefits were undoubted. The fixture was a sell-out – a rarity during the 2013/14 season in Wales. This year you would have found it easier to sell Austin Healey’s autobiography in South Wales than a ticket to watch rugby at one of the region’s grounds. But sell the tickets they did. All of them.It was a valuable marketing exercise, one which followed the Aviva model where flexible ticket pricing gets bums on seats. And bums on seats look good in front of the camera. And bums on seats in front of cameras attracts sponsors. And so on and so forth. Hopefully a lot has been learned from the Probables v Possibles fixture – off the field at least.WRU face an EGMThere will be no off season in Welsh rugby this year – it’s very much game on. David Moffett has forced the Welsh Rugby Union into an Emergency General Meeting. Forty-two clubs voted for the EGM which will take place on the 15th June in the Princess Royal Theatre, Port Talbot. It’s quite an achievement and one that shouldn’t be underestimated. Moffett’s campaign has almost become like Welsh Rugby’s ‘Wikileaks’. A deliberate drip feed of pertinent information, mostly via non-traditional media, that has made people genuinely re-appraise the situation in Welsh rugby.Of course, whether David Moffett succeeds in his bid to gain a position on the WRU board remains to be seen. As do the legitimate reasons behind the 42 clubs calling for an EGM. It is possible that the discontented member clubs only take issue with the WRU’s proposed restructuring of Wales’ lower leagues and not the whole of Moffett’s manifesto. June will be a huge month in Welsh rugby.Gareth AnscombeIn May it emerged that Warren Gatland was actively chasing Gareth Anscombe – the Chief’s outside half/ fullback. The decision to pursue Anscombe’s signature has been met with a degree of derision in Wales. But that’s very unfair. There are no fake passports. No-one has cobbled together a dodgy family-tree in Abercwmboi. This isn’t an embarrassing Shane Howarth scenario. Or even an often unpalatable residency qualification.Gareth Anscombe’s mother was born in Cardiff. He has as much right to play for Wales as Dan Biggar, Rhys Priestland or James Hook. In a difficult period for Welsh rugby where Welsh qualified players are actively leaving the country  it may be foolish to oppose a genuinely Welsh qualified player arriving in Wales. Full-house: Despite a one-sided game, it was good to see a stadium full to the rafters LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Licence to thrill: Bristol-bound Matthew Morgan lit up the trial match with his adventurous approachSlight change of tack with the Welsh squadThe Probables v Possibles fixture, the first public Welsh trial in 14 years, saw Warren Gatland name his touring squad for South Africa shortly after the final whistle. Aptly, the forwards selected show what will be ‘probable’ in South Africa – the absence of Wales’ two legitimately world class open sides mean that Gatland has opted for a back row mix of two No. 8’s, a six and two six and a halves. This policy could work very well against a Springbok pack that has the sort of mass that you would usually associate with water-based mammals, not those that roam on land.But it is in the backline where Gatland has shown what may be ‘possible’. Whilst it may be true that a good big’un beats a good little’un in the pack – in the backs, on occasion, little’uns can make big’uns look like clowns. I’m not suggesting that Jordan Williams and Matthew Morgan will start the tests, but their presence on the bench, particularly the versatile Williams, would present Gatland with an option that he hasn’t had since Shane Williams retired from test rugby. Interesting selections Mr Gatland.Crying shame: The Welsh public were denied a chance to watch Gavin Henson playWales don’t understand how windows work.There are many complicated concepts and rules in rugby. The new interpretation of a forward pass being just one – forward is now the new backward, particularly in Super Rugby. However, whilst rugby is littered with rules and regulations that many understandably struggle with; there remains one rule which couldn’t be simpler. The IRB international window. We all have windows in our houses. They’re simple contraptions. They open and they close.In the case of rugby the IRB decides when it opens and when it closes. Yet in Wales we still seem struggle with this basic concept. The recent squad that was selected for the Probables vs Possibles featured numerous players from Aviva Premiership clubs whom had absolutely no chance of playing that game. Of all the windows to mess with. The Aviva windows don’t even have a ‘safety feature’ so should you get your hand caught ‘mid close’ the Aviva windows snap your arm off and fine you a significant amount of money. Just ask Northampton, who got their arm caught in an Aviva window last season. It cost them £60,000 for allowing George North to play against the Wallabies. Ouch! Paul Williams reports on the usual month of trials and tribulations in Wales, where he turns his focus on the WRU EGM, Gareth Anscombe and IRB windowslast_img read more

French rugby looking to close foreign player loopholes

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS French clubs aren’t stupid. When the JIFF (Joueurs Issus des Filières de Formation) rules were introduced in 2010 it didn’t take them long to work out the best way to get round them.First, a reminder of those rules. The Ligue Nationale de Rugby (LNR) introduced them because the then president, Pierre-Yves Revol, and his deputy, Thierry Perez, were alarmed at the number of overseas players flooding the French game. “From the start the idea was a wish to have more French players in the Top 14 in order to increase the reservoir (of talent) for the France XV,” explained Perez, in an interview last week with Midi Olympique.The new rules stipulated that for the 2010-11 season the Top 14 squads must have 40% (14 out of 35 players) of their squad who were JIFF-qualified; in other words, players who had spent three seasons at a French club’s youth academy before turning 21 or who had been licensed to play in France for five seasons before the age of 23. From 2013-14, the percentage of JIFFs rose from 40 to 55%, and as of this season the LNR has the power to fine clubs that fail to field a match-day squad containing a minimum of 12 JIFFs.Strict: Clubs can be fined if they don’t have 12 French-qualified players in a match-day squad. Photo: Getty ImagesThe introduction of the rules appeared to have a dramatic effect on the number of overseas players being signed by the Top 14 clubs. In 2011-12, for example, 61 foreign players were recruited into the French top flight, but by 2014-15 season it was down to 34.But behind the scenes the clubs were busy altering their recruitment policy. They dispatched their scouts across the globe to identify young talent and, when spotted, these teenagers were enrolled in the clubs’ academies to begin their JIFF apprenticeship.Take the Clermont ‘Espoirs’ (youth) squad. Of the 59 players listed on the club’s website there are two Argentines, five Georgians, two South Africans, three Fijians and one player from each of England, the USA, Canada, Samoa and Portugal. The Englishman is second-row and former Northampton Saint Karl Wilkins, 20, who signed a three-year deal with Clermont in the summer of 2014. A year from now, therefore, Wilkins will have qualified as a JIFF and will no longer count as a foreigner. He will also be eligible to play for France.Eclectic mix: Clermont Auvergne have many foreign players in their squad. Photo: Getty ImagesNot surprisingly, many in France are concerned with the way the Top 14 clubs are – legitimately, it must be emphasised – sidestepping the rules that were designed to benefit the national team. “I raised the alarm two years ago,” Jean-Louis Caussinus told Midi Olympique. Caussinus, the president of the Association of Elite Rugby, continued: “Today, the clubs recruit young players from overseas and integrate them into their academies… the situation is really worrying. We are on red alert. Soon, French players won’t have any access to the academies.”As this column has stated previously, and as Midi Olympique reiterated last week, in a sense the clubs can’t be blamed for looking overseas for fresh talent. What the paper described as the “virtual disappearance” of school sport has left a generation of young French boys deficient in technical skills compared to their counterparts from the southern hemisphere. As Franck Corrihons, the technical advisor at Grenoble, admitted “it’s because of necessity, not pleasure” that clubs overlook home-grown youth. “It’s unfortunate but a fact that… from the U12s age group up, they’re behind in terms of motor skills and coordination.”Youth work: Bernard Laporte wants better coaching for young players. Photo: Getty ImagesBernard Laporte, campaigning to become the next president of the FFR, has promised to hire as many as 200 coaches to improve the technical skills of France’s young players but that will take time, even if he’s elected to the role in December.In the meantime, Midi Olympique says the LNR are considering changing the JIFF rules, so that to qualify a player must have spent two seasons playing in a junior league before the age of 18. “That could be interesting,” an LNR source told the paper. “The European court has recently forbidden clubs to recruit minors, so it will be impossible for clubs to circumvent the problem.” * According to Midi Olympique there are currently 310 JIFFs in Fédérale 1, the third division, but if the change was made then next season that number would drop dramatically to 49.Perez would support such a measure, and he’d also go further than imposing purely financial penalties on clubs. “Rather than hitting them in the pocket, I would prevent any club who doesn’t respect the regulations from qualifying for the play-offs,” he said. “That would be a far greater handicap than a fine.” National issue: Are France fans worried about the number of foreign players in the Top 14? Photo: Getty Images center_img French rugby’s powers-that-be want to make the JIFF regulations stricter to stop the flood of foreign players into the Top 14 * FIFA bans all international transfers of players under 18, except those within the European Union.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

Aviva Premiership final: Saracens 28-20 Exeter Chiefs

first_imgSTATISTICS149 – The number of metres made with the ball in hand by Alex Goode. Jack Nowell was second in the table with 66, while Schalk Brits was the next best Saracen with 56.16 – Exeter Chiefs blindside Dave Ewers showed up well in attack, carrying 16 times. Only Nowell did better, with 19.58 – Exeter had 58% of the possession and 54% of the territory but ended up on the losing side as Saracens made 163 tackles compared to 97 from the Chiefs. A spring in their step: George Kruis and his team-mates celebrate. (Photo: Getty Images) WHAT’S NOTFirst-half jitters – Exeter will look back on their first-half performance with disappointment as they made a host of unforced errors. Not many of their team have much experience of playing at Twickenham and it was perhaps telling that England wing Jack Nowell looked more at home than most. Henry Slade, the ultra-talented outside-centre knocked on a high ball and missed a tackle on Chris Wyles on his 22, letting the wing through to score Saracens’  second try, which opened up a 23-3 lead three minutes before half-time. He redeemed himself to an extent by making the break to set up Nowell’s try and the Chiefs will surely do better next time they are in a final.The Exeter lineout – It has been such a weapon all season for the Chiefs, as have the driving mauls which come from the lineouts, but before this area of set play produced a try in the second half, it misfired badly in the first. One over-thrown lineout in their own 22 led to the concession of the penalty which put Saracens 9-3 up, just after Exeter had opened their account with a Gareth Steenson penalty. Other attemped drives went nowhere. Eventually they turned one into a try, but the lineouts could have gone better.The Sarcens Here we go song – Every time Saracens kicked a penalty we were “treated” to this dirge being played over the PA at Twickenham. I hesitate  to call it a “song”. There’s not much in the way of a tune, just a plodding rhythmic chant. At a club that does so much right, it is strangely uninspiring. Stand up for the Saracens is much better. Saracens became the first team to do a domestic and European double since 2004 by adding the Aviva Premiership crown to their European Champions Cup, beating Exeter Chiefs in the final at a sun-soaked Twickenham. Hooker on the hoof: Schalk Brits bursts through to set up Saracens’ first try. (Photo: Getty Images)SARACENS: A Goode; C Ashton, D Taylor (M Bosch 73 min), B Barritt (capt), C Wyles; O Farrell (C Hodgson 68 min), R Wigglesworth (N De Kock 68 min);  M Vunipola (R Barrington 66 min), S Brits (J George 52 min), P du Plessis (J Figallo 52 min), M Itoje, G Kruis, M Rhodes (J Wray 52 min), W Fraser (J Hamilton 71 min), B Vunipola.Tries: Duncan Taylor, Chris Wyles, Marcelo Bosch. Cons: Owen Farrell 2. Pens: Owen Farrell 3EXETER CHIEFS: P Dollman; J Nowell, H Slade, I Whitten (M Campagnaro 68 min), O Woodburn (J Short 53 min); G Steenson (capt), W Chudley (D Lewis 65 min); B Moon (A Hepburn 46 min), L Cowan-Dickie (J Yeandle 46-68, 77 min), H Williams (T Francis 46 min), M Lees, G Parling (D Welch 64 min), D Ewers, J Salvi (K Horstmann 61 min), D Armand (J Salvi 65 min).Tries: Jack Yeandle, Jack Nowell. Cons: Gareth Steenson 2. Pens: Gareth Steenson 2.REFEREE: Wayne Barnes.MAN-OF-THE-MATCH: Alex Goode TAGS: Exeter ChiefsHighlightSaracens center_img Two tries in five first-half minutes gave Saracens a commanding lead which Exeter Chiefs were never able to overcome. Saracens led 9-3 on the half-hour but were 23-3 up by the 37th minute as first Duncan Taylor and then Chris Wyles cut through on the left.Taylor collected a lovely grubber kick from Owen Farrell, who kicked three penalties and two conversions to make the half-time lead 23-6.The Chiefs had looked a bit rattled by the big occasion in the first half, but were much more composed after the break and fought back with a 53rd minute try from a driving maul, scored by Jack Yeandle (although the TV credited it to Alec Hepburn). When Jack Nowell dived over the line in the right-hand corner inside the last ten minutes, Exeter looked capable of causing a real upset as the score was then 23-20, but Saracens had the final say with a terrific try for Man of the Match Alex Goode which owed everything to great handling by Marcelo Bosch and Chris Ashton. WHAT’S HOTThe Saracens defence – Exeter cannot complain of a lack of possession or opportunity, but Saracens prevented them from turning all the ball they had into points on the board as they rushed up in defence, cutting down the passing options, looking for interceptions and forcing errors. At times it was more lone wolf than wolfpack, as Saracens players darted out of the line to try to take man and ball. Only once did this tactic catch them out, as Henry Slade ran round an on-rushing opponent and through the gap to create Nowell’s try.Suffocating: The Saracens defence gave Exeter no breathing space. (Photo: Getty Images)Saracens’ big-match temperament – There was not a hint of stage-fright from Saracens, and why should there be? They won the Premiership final here last year and lifted the European Champions Cup in Lyon earlier this month. Even though the noise from the Exeter fans was filling Twickenham from the start, Saracens were unfazed and just coolly got on with the job.The Exeter Chiefs fans – Everywhere you looked around the Twickenham concourses and car parks before the game, there were feathered head-dresses and Exeter jerseys. And the Tomahawk Chop rang out before, during and long after the game. When the Chiefs came back to within three points of Saracens in the second half, the noise was deafening. In the end they will travel home disappointed, but Exeter’s fans did their team proud.Fans-tastic: The Exeter Chiefs supporters were terrific from first to last. (Photo: Getty Images)Owen Farrell’s kicking – The Saracens and England fly-half turned all Saracens’ first-half pressure into points, kicking three penalties and two difficult conversions. The scoreboard ticked away and that did not help Exeter settle on their biggest day. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS ATTENDANCE: 76,109last_img read more

Answer: Be a contestant on ‘Jeopardy’ game show

first_imgAnswer: Be a contestant on ‘Jeopardy’ game show Question: What did a Virginia Tech Episcopal chaplain recently do? Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tom O’Brien says: Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Comments are closed. Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Rev. D. Scott Russell, Episcopal Church chaplain at Virginia Tech, poses with Jeopardy quiz show Alex Trebek. Photo/Jeopardy Productions Inc.[Episcopal News Service] The Rev. D. Scott Russell, Episcopal Church chaplain at Virginia Tech, learned a few things during the journey that brought him to a recent appearance on the television quiz show “Jeopardy.”The pressure of nine million people watching you bet your knowledge against two other players can make 30 minutes pass like 30 seconds, and the bright studio lights can erase short-term memory.If you take the often-given advice to try to beat your competitors and buzz in first to win the right to answer, “you have to have the right answer.”At the same time, you have to “be in the moment and be present and not fall apart.”Also, Russell learned, “I don’t know that I have the killer instinct” needed to win.And, if you come in third and you are wearing a clerical collar, Russell said, you learn to be a “gracious loser.”“It was a privilege to get as far as I did,” Russell told Episcopal News Service about his Dec. 5 appearance, adding that the other two contestants he face were “academically inclined and they really out-competed me.”Russell matched his knowledge against Brandon Barnwell, a linguistics graduate student at University of California-Santa Barbara, and Bhibha Das, a post-doctoral researcher in physical activity and public health at University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. Das won in part by betting all the money she had accumulated on a Daily Double answer and then asking the correct question.To play the game, which has been on television since 1964, contestants are presented answers in one of six subject categories and they must respond in the form of a question. Contestants earn money based on the dollar amount assigned to each answer.Russell, associate rector at Christ Church in Blacksburg, Virginia and campus minister at Virginia Tech’s Canterbury House, earned his spot on the show by first doing well on Jeopardy’s online test. He was then invited to a regional contest.Russell learned that the show producers aren’t just interested in the fact that all his life people have been telling him he is so good at trivia games that he ought to be on Jeopardy. The producers “want to make sure you’re fun and engaging, and that you’re not just some trivia nerd,” he said.The show doesn’t keep track of how many ordained ministers or member of religious orders have appeared on the show, but Russell said that during his journey to Jeopardy he ran into another ordained Episcopalian who fit the “fun-and-engaging” and “not-a-trivia-nerd” criteria. When he was in Washington, D.C., for the taping of the regional contest, Russell said, he chanced upon Diocese of New Hampshire Bishop Gene Robinson, who told him he had been a Jeopardy contestant years ago.“He didn’t win either,” Russell said with a chuckle.Many contestants Russell met had come to Hollywood with big dreams for their potential winnings. For instance, Russell said, one wanted to win enough to re-open her grandfather’s candy store. Had Russell won, he said, his aim was to pay off his student loans.He may have placed third, but Russell still went home with some money. Second- and third-place contestants receive $2,000 and $1,000. Russell said his winnings covered his Hollywood trip expenses with a little left over.Russell wrote Dec. 6 about his experience in a blog post titled “I’ll take ‘It’s Harder than it Looks’ for $2000, Alex!”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 December 7, 2011 at 2:23 am Actually, the show has been on since the late 1960’s. I was on the show for three days in 1970 and Russell’s description is very accurate. You have to be on “automatic pilot” the whole time you are on the air. Blessings, Tom O’Brien, Southeast Florida Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET December 6, 2011 at 9:45 pm I watched the show on which this priest appeared and wish he had been identified as an Episcopalian then. No church at all was mentioned on the show. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group December 7, 2011 at 11:02 am Thanks Tom. It appears the show first aired in 1964 on CBS. The current series first aired in 1984. The article has been updated. Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Matthew Davies says: David Gable says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Dec 6, 2011 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments (3) This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

Presiding Bishop’s video message to houses of General Convention

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing General Convention 2012, Rector Smithfield, NC [Office of Public Affairs] Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori has issued a video message to the House of Deputies and the House of Bishops on the topic of the July General Convention.“I want to challenge this church to look forward and outward, rather than focusing inward and backward,” she says in her communiqué.Citing the five Marks of Anglican Mission, the presiding bishop states, “The church doesn’t have a mission; God’s mission has a church.”The video message is the initial message that the presiding bishop will offer leading up to General Convention.The message is available on the presiding bishop’s page of the Episcopal Church website here. Submit an Event Listing Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Rector Belleville, IL Presiding Bishop’s video message to houses of General Convention Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT General Convention, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Posted Jan 26, 2012 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

Cathedral deans: Houston’s Barkley Thompson

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events The Very Rev. Barkley Thompson poses with portraits of the deans and rectors that preceded him at Christ Church Cathedral in the Episcopal Diocese of Texas. Photo/Luke BlountThis is the second in a series of interviews with Episcopal cathedral deans. The first story is here.[Episcopal Diocese of Texas] Christ Church Cathedral was founded in 1839 when Houston was the capital of the Republic of Texas. It was the first religious congregation in the city and is the only one still located on its original site. Among the founding members were the republic’s attorney general, the secretaries of treasury, state and navy, and the Texas ministers to the United States and Mexico.Christ Church became the cathedral for the Diocese of Texas in 1949 during the centennial celebration of the diocese, and it serves as a place of hospitality and worship for all Episcopalians in the diocese. Six rectors of Christ Church have been elected bishop, including John Hines, who became presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church. The Very Rev. Barkley S. Thompson began his new ministry as the eighth dean of the cathedral on Feb. 7.Carol E. Barnwell: Who was the faith bearer in your family and how did you learn and experience your faith growing up?Barkley Thompson: I was blessed to be raised in an ethos of faith. My family were members of First United Methodist Church in Paragould, Arkansas, and as a child and youth I was at the church every time the door opened for church services, youth group, potluck suppers, etc. (I owe most of my knowledge of biblical content to Methodist Sunday school.)Both of my grandmothers were major faith bearers for me. My paternal grandmother potently believed in angels. My maternal grandmother began a Christmas Day family tradition when I was a small child in which our family acted out the nativity pageant. Everyone had to participate. We would dress in old bedsheets and scraps of towels and drapes to play the parts of the Holy Family, the innkeeper, the shepherds and the Wise Men. Almost 40 years later that tradition endures in my family.CEB: How did you come to a deeper faith and choose a call to ordained ministry? What were the circumstances surrounding your decision?BT: I have felt a sense of God’s calling since adolescence. I recall a moment when I was 12 or 13, standing in the darkened and empty sanctuary of First United Methodist Church in Paragould, when I uttered to God aloud that I was his. Obviously, I didn’t know at the time exactly what that meant or how it would play out, but I was earnest, and my sentiment was true. I became an Episcopalian in college (which was a return to the mother church, as my father had been raised Episcopalian), and the first person with whom I spoke about a calling to the priesthood was the Rev. Sam Portaro, who was then the Episcopal chaplain at the University of Chicago, where I was in graduate school. Sam was a great encourager, and I will be forever grateful to him.CEB: Where have you previously served, and what specific lessons do you bring from those experiences? BT: The first congregation I served as vicar and then rector was Holy Apostles, a restart parish in Memphis. Over several years the congregation had dwindled to 40 members, and when I graduated from seminary the bishop assigned me to move the remnant of the parish to the edge of suburban growth, which was lacking an Episcopal presence. We worshiped in the chapel of St. George’s High School, while the congregation grew to over 400 members. We eventually bought land and built a church campus. Holy Apostles is now served by my good friend, the Rev. John Leach, and the parish continues to thrive.I have just completed a five-and-a-half year tenure as rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Roanoke, Virginia. St. John’s is a 150-year-old, resource-size, downtown congregation in a slow-growth city. In five-plus years, we pursued innovative-yet-still-traditional forms of worship, new programs for Christian formation, outreach initiatives and enhanced Christian community.Having served in two such different environments, I have come to believe the Episcopal Church can thrive in any context. I am also convinced that the world hungers for both our sacramental and liturgical tradition and our theology of hospitality and grace.Spiritually, my experience serving parishes has reminded me again and again that it’s crucial for the priest to pray. This may seem self-evident, but in the crush of activity at a large parish, it’s all too easy for prayer to be the thing that’s nudged off of the priest’s daily agenda. It can’t be allowed to happen. Only by regularly centering oneself in God can the priest – rector or dean – shepherd the congregation toward that same center.Practically, I am reminded again and again in my vocation that we never know the inner struggles of those we meet. The parishioner whose life seems the most together is often the one barely hanging on to faith. Approaching fellow Christians with a discerning ear and an open heart can, quite literally, be the difference between life and death. The smallest occasion of grace can be life-changing to one in need.CEB: I know you have roots at the cathedral. In what way is that connection reflected in your decision to accept a call as dean here? BT: My family traces to several of the “Old Three Hundred” who moved to Texas from the United States with Stephen F. Austin in the 1820s. My great-grandfather moved from Bellville, Texas, to Houston as a young professional, and my grandfather was raised at Christ Church Cathedral. I grew up hearing stories of ancestors who settled the land, made Texas home and fought for Texas independence. When I was a seminarian at the Seminary of the Southwest (http://www.ssw.edu/) in Austin, I was able to connect with my Texas roots. My parents made numerous visits to Austin, and we took day trips to Fayette County (from which most of my Texas ancestors hail), College Station (where my dad went to college) and other areas. The sense of calling to Christ Church Cathedral is not due to my family’s history, but added to all of the other signs that God is wedding the cathedral and me in shared ministry. My Texas roots make this move feel like a homecoming of sorts.CEB: Houston is an incredibly diverse city, ethnically and culturally. How will you meet the challenge of becoming a more diverse congregation? BT: Most importantly, the future shape of the cathedral congregation must result from a shared vision developed prayerfully over time, in close consultation with lay leadership and with broad input from the cathedral community. For that to take place, the cathedral and the dean must first have the opportunity to build trust in one another. Growth of any kind – in diversity, numbers, programs, etc. – necessarily involves change. Only through a careful, faithful and deliberate process will the dean and cathedral be able to pursue any sort of initiative with anticipation, hope and joy.That said, I can offer a few general thoughts on increasing congregational diversity. Cultural diversity can refer to nationality and ethnicity but also to generational differences and different socio-economic strata. Part of the reason mainline Christianity has so often failed to increase diversity is that churches tend to decide in a vacuum what non-represented, prospective parishioners want or need and then expect non-Episcopalian or unchurched people to embrace what we offer. The key is first to listen to the spoken hopes and needs of, for instance, the people who’ve recently made downtown Houston their home and who might be seeking a spiritual community. Only then can the cathedral know how best to respond in a way that will welcome newcomers to our midst.CEB: How do you envision the cathedral’s life in downtown Houston, in the Diocese of Texas? BT: I’ll reiterate here what I said above: Any specific vision for the cathedral’s role in downtown Houston and in the Diocese of Texas must be a shared vision developed prayerfully over time by the dean, the cathedral community and (with regard to the diocese) the bishop. With that in mind, I can offer some fairly general thoughts about my understanding of urban, downtown ministry and the cathedral’s role as the diocese’s central church.In Roanoke, St. John’s (where I most recently served) sits equidistant between the Wells Fargo Tower and Roanoke Memorial Hospital (a level 1 trauma center), which means that the parish exists in the very heart of the commercial, banking, governmental and health-care center of southwestern Virginia. When I would hear the bells of St. John’s ring each hour, they served as a reminder that God resides, not only in Sunday worship, but also in the midst of each of these parts of our collective lives. God has something to say about how we do business, how we treat our citizens and how we care for those who are hurting. God lays claim to all of us, and, because the incarnate God abides among us, all of life is holy. Urban, downtown parishes like Christ Church Cathedral bear the responsibility for reminding the city of this truth, and that responsibility is a challenge, an opportunity and a privilege.Because of its central role and location, the cathedral also can serve in Houston as an iconic alternative to other forms of Christianity that are insular and often focus on individualistic, material well-being rather than the redemption of the whole community as the body of Christ. We can be a place of spiritual welcome and refuge to all who walk through our doors seeking to know the love of God more deeply.Additionally, I hope the cathedral increasingly will serve as a center of formation, worship and cohesive identity for all Episcopalians in the Diocese of Texas, and I look forward to partnering with Bishop [C. Andrew] Doyle in developing ideas for how this might be so. In the Episcopal Church, we are fond of saying that the basic component of the church is the diocese rather than the parish, and in that sense the cathedral belongs to all Episcopalians in the diocese. (Dean [Joe] Reynolds took good care to emphasize this.)CEB: How and where did you meet your wife? How is your life together reflected in your ministry? BT: Jill and I met at Hendrix College, a fantastic liberal arts school outside of Little Rock, [Arkansas]. We lived a few doors from one another in the college apartments. Jill is a cradle Episcopalian from Trinity Cathedral in Little Rock, and since I had recently moved from the Methodist to the Episcopal Church myself, it was easy to fall in love with an Episcopalian!On the one hand, Jill is my touchstone, my counselor and my best friend. She enables me to be a faithful priest. On the other hand, Jill has engaged in the ministry of the church in her own areas of passion and interest. In recent years, she has helped with children’s ministry, and last year she co-led St. John’s-Roanoke’s “Club 45,” which is a pre-youth group for fourth- and fifth-graders. In her professional life, Jill is a physical therapist. That and motherhood are her vocations.Carol E. Barnwell is communications director for the Episcopal Diocese of Texas. This interview first appeared in the March issue of the diocesan publication Diolog. Barbara Olive says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI March 17, 2013 at 10:43 am great series on cathedral deans….how about something on the deans in rural and poor dioceses, like Idaho and Wyoming? Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group By Carol E. BarnwellPosted Mar 14, 2013 Comments (3) Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Deans Series 2013 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ March 14, 2013 at 10:43 pm It was so wonderful to read your remarks and I know you truly are the man to be called the Very Rev. Barkley Thompson. I just wanted to say congratulations to you, Jill, Griffin, and Eliza. I pray for you all and know that Christ Church Catheral is blessed to have you. Whenever it may be, if God willing, David and I will be at your ordination when you become Bishop. Just as exciting as it was to see the new Pope, it will also be exciting to see you become a Bishop. Peace Be With You!Barbara & David Olive New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 March 14, 2013 at 6:52 pm Way to go, Barkley, Joe Reynolds and Sam Portaro (the latter two of whom and I attended VTS at the same time). Nice to see three good priests serving well. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA The Rev. Canon William A. Kolb says: bill thompson-uberuaga says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral deans: Houston’s Barkley Thompson Houston’s new Christ Church Cathedral dean comes ‘home’ to Texas Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Comments are closed. Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more