Kevin Garnett Demanded Reggie Evans Stay With Brooklyn Nets

When Kevin Garnett was traded to the Brooklyn Nets from the Boston Celtics, part of the arrangement was for him to go to Brooklyn with teammates Paul Pierce and Jason Terry. What has recently become public knowledge is: Garnett also demanded that Reggie Evans remain on the Brooklyn roster so that they would play together.“I won’t go into specific details of what I was wanting and dislikes and everything else when it came to building the business of basketball,” Garnett said before the Nets beat the 76ers, 127-97, in Monday night’s preseason game at Wachovia Center. “But I will say this: One of the key things for me was not only Paul (Pierce) and ‘Jet’ (Jason Terry) coming here with me to make it comfortable, but Reggie Evans had to be on the roster. That was a huge key for me coming here.”Garnett really respects Evans’ work ethics on the court and according to Evans the two players really hit it off.“Me and KG, we’re just clicking,” Evans said. “We are just taking advantage of this moment, and taking advantage of it is winning a championship. Sometimes you’ve got to do the little stuff, always talking to each other, communicating with each other and stuff like that. Everything is a process and we are slowly getting to know each other on the court and off the court. Dapping each other up, all that stuff is coming natural. Ain’t nothing fake about it. It’s all just natural, which is good.”Garnett and Evans formed a bond that will benefit both players, especially Evans who’s getting the opportunity to get mentored by a Championship player. read more

Researchers find first instance of fish larvae making sounds

center_img Scientists know that adult fish make noise, many fishermen have heard them, also, some have been found to actually “yell” louder to be heard when surrounded by other noise, such as from a boat engine. But, as the research trio point out, few studies have been conducted to learn about the possibly of noise made by young fish or even fish larvae. In their study, they looked at gray snappers (Lutjanus griseus) that live off the coast of Florida.Adult female gray snappers drop their eggs in the open ocean into beds of seagrass—larvae that emerge live off food in the seagrass bed until reaching maturity. To find out if the larvae make noise, the researches put a camera, microphone and lights into a waterproof clear box and dropped it into the sea at night—the lights helped find where the snappers congregated. To make sure the noises they were recording were coming from the larvae, the researchers captured several larvae samples and took them back to their lab where they were recorded in a tank of water. Analysis of the recordings showed the larvae made two kinds of sounds: “knocking” and “growling.” Interestingly, the knocking sound was very similar to the knocking sounds made by adults of the same species. They noted also that the pattern of sounds generated by the larva differed depending on if they were in the open ocean or in the lab tank—in the lab, the larvae produced more sounds per interval and had longer times between them, suggesting perhaps that they were waiting to hear a reply.The researchers can’t say for sure why the larva make noise but suggest it might help the snappers as a whole maintain group cohesion at night when it’s more difficult to see. They suggest the growling sound may be similar to the cries that babies of many species make to get the attention of the adults. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Lutjanus griseus. Credit: Randall, J.E/fishbase.org (Phys.org) —A trio of researchers with the University of Miami has recorded sounds made by fish larvae in both the open ocean and in their lab. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Erica Staaterman, Claire Paris and Andrew Kough describe how they captured the larvae sounds and offer ideas on why they are made. Citation: Researchers find first instance of fish larvae making sounds (2014, October 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-10-instance-fish-larvae.html Play “Knock” sounds produced by L. griseus larvae in the field. Credit: Biol. Lett. October 2014 vol. 10 no. 10 20140643 last_img read more