Bishop Sean Rowe is elected provisional bishop of Bethlehem diocese

first_img Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Posted Mar 3, 2014 Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Elections, Rector Tampa, FL [Canticle Communications] A special convention of the Episcopal Diocese of Bethlehem on March 1 elected the Rt. Rev. Sean Rowe as the provisional bishop of Bethlehem.The diocese comprises 14 counties in northeastern Pennsylvania and includes the cities of Allentown, Bethlehem, Easton, Hazleton, Reading, Scranton and Wilkes-Barre.“It’s a great day in the kingdom,” said Rowe after his election. “I am humbled and count it a privilege to stand before you today as your bishop. I am excited about this opportunity to serve you.”Rowe has been bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Northwestern Pennsylvania for seven years, and will continue in that role. His position in the diocese of Bethlehem will continue for three years.“My style is a collaborative one in which we will work together — bishop, clergy and lay leaders,” said Rowe in an address to the convention following his election. “I hope you will find yourself welcome to a table large enough to hear your voice. Collaboration requires relationships of substance, and I want to spent time getting to know you, hear your stories, and learn to care about those ministries for which you have great passion and excitement.”All of 64 of the clergy present and 99 of the 100 laypeople voted in favor of Rowe’s election, which required a two-thirds vote.“The Standing Committee chose Bishop Sean as our nominee for provisional bishop because of his stable, forward-thinking leadership in Northwestern Pennsylvania,” said the Rev. Canon Andrew T. Gerns, president of the Standing Committee in Bethlehem and rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Easton. “He has a strong track record of building relationships with clergy and lay leaders and proven skill at resolving conflict directly and effectively. We’re delighted at his election and grateful that the Standing Committee of the Episcopal Diocese of Northwestern Pennsylvania has so readily agreed to undertake this innovative arrangement with us.”“Today you did not elect the smartest or the most spiritual bishop ever. The fact is, there are people here who have been praying twice as long as I’ve been alive,” said Rowe, who is 39. “What you’ll get is one who is faithful to God, at least most of the time, and one who stands firmly on the promises of Jesus Christ. I am your servant.”The Diocese of Bethlehem’s previous bishop, the Rt. Rev. Paul V. Marshall, retired on Dec. 31 after a terminal sabbatical. On Jan. 1, the Standing Committee announced its plan to call a provisional bishop for a three-year term.Rowe will take up his new duties immediately and by August 2014 spend half of his time in each diocese. He, his wife, Carly, and their one-year-old daughter, Lauren, will have a home in both suburban Erie and in Bethlehem.Rowe was ordained bishop of Northwestern Pennsylvania, which comprises 33 congregations in 13 counties, in 2007. He is known for developing transformational leadership and is a Ph.D. candidate in organizational learning and leadership at Gannon University. He is a 2000 graduate of Virginia Theological Seminary and a 1997 graduate of Grove City College. He serves as parliamentarian for the House of Bishops, chair of the Episcopal Church Building Fund, and member of the General Board of Examining Chaplains, the Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church, and the Council of Advice to the President of the House of Deputies.The Episcopal Diocese of Bethlehem comprises 63 congregations in the 14 counties of northeastern Pennsylvania. To learn more, visit www.diobeth.org. The Episcopal Diocese of Northwestern Pennsylvania comprises 33 congregations in the 13 counties in northwestern Pennsylvania. To learn more, visit www.dionwpa.org. Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Comments (1) center_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME People Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA March 3, 2014 at 4:20 pm How curiously refreshing to see “comprise” used correctly for a change. Bravo!!! Rector Martinsville, VA David Krohne says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab House of Bishops, Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Sean Rowe is elected provisional bishop of Bethlehem diocese Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags Rector Bath, NC last_img read more

‘Come and see the new Honduras’

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Lloyd Allen confirmed 11 people and received 13 more into the Episcopal Church on March 9 at La Misión San José in El Cedral, Honduras. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service] What does it mean to be the church in Honduras?It’s a question Bishop Lloyd Allen and others in the Diocese of Honduras have begun asking themselves as they fine-tune their 2019 self-sustainability plan and move away from more than 150 years of dependency.Although financial independence and self-sustainability may sound like invigorating concepts to North Americans, moving away from a century and a half of dependence — needs influenced and met by outside support — doesn’t come easy in Honduras, or more broadly in Latin America, where a deeply embedded culture of dependence dates back to the Spanish occupation, and in the church to when Anglicans established their first colonial mission outposts.“Like it or not, as difficult as this may seem, I think it’s time for the diocese to begin to walk away from that legacy of dependency,” said Allen in a 2012 address to the Diocese of Central Florida’s convention, echoing words he’d spoken a year earlier during his own diocese’s annual meeting.In Central Florida, a longtime companion diocese, the crowd applauded Allen’s words. Back in Honduras, however, his proclamation had not been as well received. “I may not be the most popular person in the Diocese of Honduras now,” he said.Moving away from dependency, Allen soon realized, would require changing a deeply held mindset, and wasn’t something that could be accomplished by inviting in consultants and conducting workshops.“We are on the road; I don’t know how long it’s going to take,” he said. “ … we’re on our way, cost us what it may. Growth doesn’t come easy.”At the center of that growth is a complete overhaul of the relationship between the diocese and its missions and preaching stations. As it is and has always been, money flows from the diocese to the 124 congregations. The flow must be reversed; when that’s accomplished, the diocese can begin to send its support to the Episcopal Church, reversing that longstanding relationship of dependency.“That’s a real change in dynamics,” said the Rev. Canon Lura Kaval, the diocese’s development officer and an Episcopal Church-appointed missionary based in San Pedro Sula.In addition to the $227,000 the diocese receives from the Episcopal Church, the diocese operates seven, bilingual schools, a conference center, a warehouse and EpiscoTours, which handles the travel arrangements and itineraries for mission teams, all of which generate revenue. The diocese also has incorporated a nonprofit organization in the United States, the Honduras Development Network, to raise funds.Historical perspective  The Church of England transferred jurisdiction of the missionary outposts in Central America and the Caribbean to the U.S.-based Episcopal Church following World War II. Two decades later in the 1960s, the trend across the Anglican Communion was to examine the church’s missionary work in a post-colonial world, moving away from “paternalistic treatment of the overseas ‘missionary districts,’ ” according to archived documents.The 1964 General Convention established Province IX “to foster relationships among districts in Latin America that would lead toward self-support.”Honduras is the only Episcopal diocese in Central American belonging to Province IX; the others — El Salvador, Guatemala, Panama, Costa Rica and Nicaragua — belong to the Anglican Churches in Central America, or IARCA its Spanish acronym, a province of the Anglican Communion.The other Province IX churches include, in South America, Ecuador Central, Ecuador Litoral, Colombia, and Venezuela, and in the Caribbean, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico.In February, on the recommendation of the Second Mark of Mission working group, a group convened by the staff of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council agreed to an 18-year plan for “self-sufficiency,” to move to sustainable mission and ministry in Province IXThe Episcopal Church historically has supported the Province IX churches through a block grant program, which provides the dioceses with operating funds amounting to $2.9 million in the current triennium.  The triennial budget also included an additional $1 million for Province IX with the goal of “strengthening the province for sustainable mission.” This money will be made available to the dioceses to further their progress toward self-sustainability.In 2009 the General Convention budget slashed the block grant program, decreasing the amount dioceses received by a third; although the abrupt cuts came as a surprise, they weren’t totally unexpected.In the first years of his episcopacy, Allen served on the church’s Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance and “saw the writing on the wall,” he said.“I would come home and share my thoughts and concerns with the clergy, and I would say we need to look forward and try to walk away from dependency.”Ordained and consecrated in 2001, Allen hired an outside consultant to assist the diocese in creating a strategic plan, the first of which was introduced in 2004 and updated in 2007; the 2019 plan for self-sufficiency builds on those previous plans.Following Hurricane Mitch, a Category 5 hurricane that killed more than 7,000 people and caused more than $2 billion in damage when it hit Honduras in late October 1998, billions of dollars in international aid money poured in and teams of volunteers began arriving to help in the rebuilding of the Central American country.In development terms, the country’s then-president said Mitch set back Honduras 50 years; Mitch also marked a turning point in which Honduras’ gangs became better organized and the country’s security situation began to deteriorate.Eventually, the media coverage and the outpouring of funds and assistance dwindled. Yet the Episcopal Church remained, and began to retool and to grow, and the 2019 plan, “Come and see the new Honduras,” took shape.Engaging leadershipFast-forward to March 2014 and a daylong parochial report conference held at Iglesia de Espiritu Santo in Santa Rita de Copán, where 60 leaders gathered from 26 of some 30 missions and preaching stations in the Copán and Maya deaneries covering the country’s far southwest.“Everything we need in the Diocese of Honduras God has given us,” said Kaval. “Part of this is to help the people see what we have.”The four-page parochial report records demographics, revenue and expenses, clergy, baptism, confirmation and educational information, and is intended for mission planning. The diocese plans to use the information gathered by the parochial reports to apply the principals of asset-based community development to help its missions and preaching stations become self-sustaining. Additionally the Five Marks of Mission form an integral part of the diocese’s self-sustainability plan; they provide a road map to determine what it means to be the church in Honduras and as the basis for leadership development and stewardship.The 2019 self-sustainability plan, Venga y ver la nueva Honduras, or “Come and see the new Honduras,” begins with empowering the clergy and laity. In the spring of 2013, the diocese formed lay leaderships teams providing them with the Five Marks of Mission and the diocese’s goals for financial independence and self-sustainability, with the intention being that the clergy and lay leaders would hold each other accountable.From scarcity to abundanceIn a country where 60 percent of 7.9 million people live in poverty, Copán is the third poorest department in the country, which in land area is about the size of Kentucky. Still, the 46 missions in the Copán and Maya deaneries are some of the most resourceful and least dependent on the diocese.“These two are way ahead on stewardship, and they are building their own churches,” said Allen, adding that they’re a model for the other deaneries. “There’s very little that we [the diocese] do for them.”Bishop Lloyd Allen confirmed 11 people on March 9 at La Misión San José in El Cedral, Honduras. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSAn hours’ drive up the mountain from La Entrada, a literal fork in the road in southwest Honduras that in one direction leads to the Mayan ruins in Copán, sits La Misión San José, a relatively new mission of the Diocese of Honduras, but one that grew March 9 when 11 people were confirmed and 13 received into the Episcopal Church.Allen preached and presided at the service that day, the first Sunday of Lent, where parishioners had hung balloons and scattered purple and white flower petals down the aisle. Allen recently asked the congregation, now officially a mission, to look to the Book of Common Prayer, the saints and feasts, to choose a name. They chose San José.Misión San José is led by Yolanda Portillo, a lay leader who has grown the church.“I’m a firm believer in women’s ministry; she has turned the church around,” said Allen, on the drive to La Cedral, where 2,500 people live in and around the community, largely employed in the coffee industry.The church has grown, Portillo said, through preaching the Gospel door-to-door.At the start of Allen’s episcopacy, the diocese had 87 congregations served by 22 priests, almost half of them foreign. Over a two-day period in 2005, he ordained 25 deacons. Today the diocese has 156 missions served by 56 priests and 16 deacons, the majority of them Hondurans. The number of Episcopalians has reached 65,000.Examples of congregational growth, self-sustainability and community outreach can be seen throughout the diocese. Another example is Parroquia Manos de Dios in Danlí, a town 60 miles southeast of Tegucigalpa, the capital, near the border with Nicaragua.The Rev. Roberto Martinez Amengual, Bishop Lloyd Allen and Victor Manuel Velasquez at Manos de Dios in Danli. Manos de Dios serves as a model of self-sustainability for the rest of the diocese. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSLed by Victor Manuel Velasquez, Manos de Dios began as a house church in 2000, but with the help of the Anglican Agency for Development in Honduras, or Aanglidesh as it is called, and its partnership with Episcopal Relief & Development, has grown to include a large facility with a community center, space for workshops, a computer lab and an income-generating store that sells supplies to students attending a nearby technical school.It’s that kind of entrepreneurship that Allen says serves as a model for other congregations in the diocese, and one that the Rev. Roberto Martinez Amengual, Aanglidesh’s administrator, said demonstrates the power of partnerships.Manos de Dios also provides space for a savings and loan program and microcredit serving women and families in Danlí.“Our partnership with Aanglidesh in rural Honduras is a strong example of the asset-based approach we promote throughout our work worldwide,” said Kirsten Laursen Muth, Episcopal Relief & Development’s senior director of international programs.On a tour of Manos de Dios, Velasquez explained that a $5,000 revolving loan, along with the help of mission teams from the United States, made the building possible.“You can see where the investment went,” he said. “We will become a parish really soon.”The diocese already has moved four missions to parish status: St. Mary’s in Tegucigalpa, Holy Trinity in La Ceiba, Good Shepherd in San Pedro Sula and Holy Spirit in Tela. Thirteen of 156 missions have been identified for “supported-parish status,” meaning they’re close to being able to pay 50 percent of the clergy costs. Most of the diocese’s urban congregations have schools, and have realized they can support their own clergy, said Allen.“There will be missions out in the rural areas that will never become (parishes); maybe two or three will have to come together,” said Allen.StewardshipProtestant and evangelical churches are gaining on the Roman Catholic Church in Honduras, where it’s not uncommon for a Roman Catholic priest to visit a parish once or twice a year, and when the priest does come, he must be paid, said Allen, explaining part of the reason for growth in his diocese. Additionally, as demonstrated in Danlí, Episcopal missions often address societal needs in the community. Still, Episcopal clergy aren’t always comfortable asking for support from their parishioners.The Rev. Vaike Madisson de Molina, the vicar San Bartolomé Apóstol in Siguatepeque, worked with the Ministry of Health to establish a nursing school at her church. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSFor instance, at San Bartolomé Apóstol in Siguatepeque, a small town in the Central Mountains on the main route between San Pedro Sula and Tegucigalpa, the Rev. Vaike Madisson de Molina, the vicar, worked with the Ministry of Health to establish a nursing school and completed the coursework despite the fact that she’s too old to be licensed; yet when the topic of self-sustainability and asking for support from the congregation is broached, she becomes visibly uncomfortable.Diocesan leaders say it’s this mindset that needs to change in order for the missions to become self-sustaining and to contribute money to the diocesan budget; clergy need to embrace stewardship, and begin asking their congregations for support.“The clergy need to make people understand that they are the church … it’s not about going to church, it’s about being the church,” said Rick Harlow, the diocese’s project manager and an Episcopal Church-appointed missionary.The diocese recently hosted a clergy conference focused on stewardship, where the Rev. Gary C. Hoag, co-author of  “The Sower,” presented concepts and workshops aimed at “developing faithful stewards.”At Misión San Fernando Rey in Omoa, where Ana Reid, a missionary serving in Honduras as part of the Society of Anglican Missionaries and Senders, or SAMS, stewardship, building on the local evangelical influence, is an integral component to rebuilding a mission station that had otherwise been neglected and gone to rack and ruin.“In the evangelical church, it’s taught you need to give your 10 percent; it’s ingrained in you as a responsibility as a Christian,” said Reid, who is from Danvers, Massachusetts. “They are very strong on the teaching that through giving, you receive.”Ana Reid, a missionary serving in Honduras as part of the Society of Anglican Missionaries and Senders, or SAMS, is helping to rebuild Misión San Fernando Rey in Muchilena. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSFor Reid, however, she continued, it’s all about education and training. For those who’ve come from the Roman Catholic Church, the practice has been to put small change in the offering plate because historically the priest was paid by someone else; parishioners were not required to participate in the life of the parish and support it financially. She says the Episcopal Church hasn’t been strong on teaching tithing, either.“It’s a spiritual discipline,” she said, adding that there are clergy who themselves don’t tithe. “If they themselves are not doing it, they cannot preach it.”In addition to teaching about stewardship in rebuilding San Fernando Rey, Reid has helped David Dominguez, the lay leader, to offer English classes at the parish, which is also planning to operate an Internet lab after conducting a market study to determine the need and the desire for one in the community. The parish also plans an outside café that will cater to tourists.“I’m not the priest, I’m not the person in charge, I’m just here to help,” said Reid, adding that she’s not just telling the people what to do, but doing it herself. “I get my hands dirty.”Ultimately, Reid’s plan is to empower lay leaders and work herself out of a job.Back to the church’s beginningsThe Honduran government official recognized the Episcopal Church 150 years ago, however the Anglican-Episcopal presence in Honduras dates back 400 years to 1639, when buccaneers brought the Anglican Church to Roatán, the largest of Honduras’ bay islands, and established Emmanuel Anglican Church on Port Royal.Allen sent the Rev. Nelson Mejia and his wife, the Rev. Kara Mejias, to Roatán to re-establish an Episcopal Church presence on the largest of Honduras’ Bay Islands, a 90-minute ferry ride from the mainland, which they’ve done already in an area called Brick Bay. A second church, made possible with a grant from church planting and ministry redevelopment, is in the first phases of construction. The Rev. Nelson Mejia and Rick Harlow, the diocese’s project manager and an Episcopal Church-appointed missionary review plans for the new church plant in Roatán. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSThe new church, which will be called Emmanuel for the church the buccaneers founded in 17th century, is planned for Coxen Hole, a growing community of 20,000 people. Construction began on the site in August 2014; before that the congregation met in homes and later rented a small room in town, said the Rev. Nelson Mejia.The permanent building will be concrete with reinforced beams, and in addition to the sanctuary, there will also be a parish hall and a sewing room to support a micro-business.For now, church takes place under a temporary, wood-framed shelter, a heavy tarpaulin serves as the roof; the floor is dirt. Bathrooms, needed for the church to host events, are off to the side, along with a storage shed where plastic chairs, the podium, a keyboard, projector and other supplies for the service and Sunday school are stored. Mejia and his family arrive a few minutes before the service to set up.Companion relationships, mission teamsThe 2019 plan also invites participation from North American partners, who are invited to join a mission team, share professional expertise or to support a clergy member through its Clergy Partnership Program.The diocese began operating short-term mission trips in 1992 without incident. But the rise of gangs and international headlines portraying the violence have lead to an almost 50 percent drop in the number of mission teams in recent years.“The increase in violence has really affected us greatly,” said Allen. “A lot of people ask me if [short-term missions] are still safe.” The diocese in Honduras provides mission teams with 24/7 guides and drivers, from arrival to departure.Larry Tate, a member of Church of the Incarnation in Dallas, Texas, who over the years has led many short-term mission teams to Honduras, and who was in Honduras in March scouting his team’s next trip, said his No. 1 priority is keep team members safe.“We won’t put people in danger,” he said, adding he keeps an eye on the news. “We listen to what the bishop tells us and we ask questions.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Self-Sustainability Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Laura Booke says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI By Lynette WilsonPosted May 7, 2014 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Comments are closed. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments (1) ‘Come and see the new Honduras’ Breaking a 150-year cycle of dependency Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL May 8, 2014 at 10:33 am I and we at Timothy’s Episcopal Church, Cincinnati, Ohio, are active in supporting El Hogar, home and school for poorchildren in Tegucigalpa. Other churches in our area are also similarly engaged. The headquarters for El Hogar Ministries, Inc. is in Winchester, Massachusetts.In what ways, if any, does the diocese and Bishop Allen connect with El Hogar?Thank you.Laura Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Latin America, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Province IX, Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

Dallas diocese elects George Sumner as next bishop

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 [Episcopal Diocese of Dallas] The Rev. Canon George Sumner was elected May 16 to serve as the next bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Dallas, pending the required consents from a majority of bishops with jurisdiction and standing committees of The Episcopal Church.Sumner, 60, is currently the principal of Wycliffe College in Toronto, Canada, and was one of four nominees on the ballot for the diocese’s 7th bishop. He received 77 votes from clergy and 107 votes from laity on the fourth ballot during a special convention held at the Episcopal School of Dallas. In order to be elected, a candidate needed to receive a simple majority of votes within both the clergy order and the lay order on the same ballot.“I am humbled and grateful to God for my election,” Sumner said. “It will be a great privilege to share in the ministry Christ has given us all together in the Diocese of Dallas. I would like to express my appreciation for my fellow candidates and the remarkable transition team. I ask for your prayers and help in the days to come.”If Sumner receives the majority of consents from the bishops and standing committees of the dioceses in The Episcopal Church, he will be consecrated as bishop on Nov. 14.Bishop Suffragan Paul E. Lambert has been serving as bishop pro-tem since the Rt. Rev. James Stanton retired May 2014 after serving for 21 years as bishop of Dallas.Lambert said he is happily anticipating a renewed excitement and energy that a new bishop will bring to the diocese.“I look forward to working with Bishop-elect Sumner as we move into our next period of transition, the consent process,” Lambert said. “The future of the diocese looks bright and is in good hands.”The other nominees were the Rev. Mike Michie, the Rev. David Read and the Rev. Leigh Spruill.Sumner has a Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard College, a Master of Divinity degree from Yale Divinity School and a Ph.D. in theology from Yale University. He is married to Stephanie and has two children. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Elections, Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL House of Bishops, Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska by diocesan staffPosted May 18, 2015 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT People Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Dallas diocese elects George Sumner as next bishop Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME last_img read more

Orange County Emergency Operations: Conserve water

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Shannon Carol H Klinger Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 We live in Apopka and left because of the storm. Impossible to find any news about damage and power or gasoline. How do we know it’s safe to return home. Power outages are sporadic throughout Apopka. There are long lines for gas stations that have gasoline. There are a few streets with some flooding.In our neighborhood there are a lot of tree branches down and a lot of leaves everywhere. The only damage I’ve seen so far has been to signs. 2 COMMENTS September 12, 2017 at 9:59 pm Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSOrange County Emergency Operations Previous articleApopka native serving on a Navy missile destroyerNext articleEverything you want to know about non-maintained roadways… Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Reply center_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your comment! From the Orange County Emergency Operations Center It’s been more than 24 hours now since Hurricane Irma impacted Central Florida. The Orange County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) remains at a level 1 so that Orange County’s recovery can help the community and citizens return to normal day-to-day activities. Orange County personnel have been working around the clock, as well as first responders, Utilities, Public Works and community partners. For official Orange County emergency information, visit www.ocfl.net/Irma.SHELTERSThe majority of Orange County shelters closed at 10 p.m. last night.The morning of Sept. 12, approximately 90 stranded passengers were being transported back to airports to catch flights.Orange County is hosting approximately 70 individuals in shelters who will need longer-term assistance. The American Red Cross will be stepping in to help with that support.FLOODINGThere is extensive flooding in the Orlo-Vista community. Orange County Fire Rescue (OCFR) and National Guardsmen helped to rescue more than 135 individuals, as well as their animals.Some individuals have stayed behind. Today, OCFR will continue going door-to-door today encouraging residents to seek safety.POWERSimilar to our neighbors across the state, Orange County continues to experience significant power outages.Reports this morning suggest that more than 300,000 household remain without power.PUBLIC WORKS/TRAFFIC SIGNALS:Orange County monitors nearly 600 traffic signals.With the power out, many of our traffic signals are still out.OCFR reported 35 traffic accidents last night, a few of which involved vehicles crashing into law enforcement.When approaching an intersection and the light is out – drivers are required to make a 4-way stop – even if you do not see immediate oncoming traffic.PUBLIC WORKS/DEBRIS ASSISTANCEAs of noon today, five sites were open. On Sept.13; five more will open. Please continue to check ocfl.net for location information.If you live in one of our cities, please check with them on how their debris pick up will plan/locations will work.Curbside debris pick up assistance will not begin before Thursday morning. Please check ocfl.net for details.The Orange County landfill is open with regular hours.UTILITIES/GARBAGE Garbage service resumed today. This is for regular garbage. Orange County will pick yard waste. If it will fit in your container, Orange County will pick it up. Larger items will be picked up at a later date.Daily garbage service has been moved back by one day in Orange County. If you were Monday pickup, you are Tuesday this week moving through Saturday.UTILITIES/WATEROrange County is asking residents to conserve water. The storm placed a considerable strain on our pump stations.Please reduce how often you are flushing toilets.Please also refrain from running washing machines and dishwashers. And please don’t take long showers now.We also ask that if you conserved water in a bathtub, do not do drain that water yet.BUILDING SAFETYOrange County has dispatched 12 damage assessment teams in the field yesterday, more today. Their focus is on safety.We are prepared to waive permitting fees for individuals and businesses that need contractual repairs.ROADWAYS/TRANSPORTATION:Based on the 311 calls and inspections, we believe that all roads are passable. However, there may be some limbs. Call 311 if you are aware of any roadways that are not passable.PUBLIC SAFETY REMINDERS: Be careful with food that may have spoiled with power outages.Tip, Toss and Cover. There is a lot of water collecting in small items. Empty them to help minimize the potential for mosquito-borne illnesses.PLEASE be careful with generators and chainsaws. This is a time in which accidents can easily happen.DISASTER ASSISTANCE/CONSUMER FRAUDOne of Orange County’s main goals is to help residents recognize fraud and teach them how to avoid becoming a victim.A valid license is the first indication that your contractor might be qualified to do the job. According to the Orange County Consumer Fraud Office, you should do the following when hiring a contractor:Avoid door-to-door solicitors.Insist on references, a proper license, bonding and insurance. Check out credentials.Make sure the contract can be broken if you don’t receive financing. Hire a contractor with a real office, not just a post office box address.For more information on the Orange County Consumer Fraud Office and protecting yourself from fraud call 407-836-2490 or 311, or email [email protected] September 12, 2017 at 7:09 pm You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Anatomy of Fear Reply Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

George North free to play after sickening landing worries fans

first_imgMonday Dec 5, 2016 George North free to play after sickening landing worries fans George North’s rugby future appeared to have taken another blow this weekend as he landed heavily after a challenge for a high ball against Leicester Tigers. It is yet another in a worrying string of knocks that the young Northampton Saints winger has suffered. North went up for a bouncing ball as Adam Thomstone unfortunately caught him in the air. The 24-year-old came down with a thud, appearing to knock himself out in the process.The landing was awkward and by his reaction, it appeared as though his head had knocked the turf and he was out cold. However, the medical staff followed protocol and North returned to play.Northampton Saints have issued a statement since the incident at Welford Road. They said that following the treatment and medical assessment of North, he was passed fit to return to play.“George was communicating immediately with attending medics and complaining of neck pain. Significant neck injury was excluded on the field but on review of video footage pitch side, the team followed World Rugby protocols and used a Head Injury Assessment given the potential mechanism for head injury.“Northampton Saints places the highest importance on player care and their safety is the club’s primary concern.”North tweeted “I can’t help but feel I won’t be looking left or right for a few days” and explained that he was mainly concerned about his neck when it happened.Fans and pundits have shown concern for his wellbeing, as another serious knock may well mean the end of his career, due to his well documented concussion history.He suffered four head knocks in five months between November 2014 and March 2015, including two in one match. He reportedly had some clear side affects from them and it’s been said that another serious blow could leave lasting damage.The story of former England winger Shontayne Hape comes to mind. Hape was knocked out so many times that even the slightest bit of contact at training would spark him out.He covered it up at the time but later revealed that he has suffered from severe head pain and his life was turned upside down as a result.Another player went on record as saying that he himself, and others he witnessed, would find a way to ‘cheat’ concussion tests so that they would not put their careers in jeopardy by missing matches.A Premiership Rugby spokesman has said that they will investigate this latest incident.“Every head injury incident that occurs in Aviva Premiership rugby is assessed by an independent reviewer as part of our procedure to manage concussion. This is a world-leading system of assessment to ensure we take a comprehensive look at every incident which involves a potential head injury. Player welfare is our No 1 priority.”credit: iancameronADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error See it to Believe it Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Experts explain what actually happens… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Leigh Halfpenny makes yet another… 26 WEEKS AGO Parisse alley-oop magic sets up brilliant… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Online office procurement saves Cancer Research UK over £2.5 million

first_img  58 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 16 July 2006 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Online office procurement saves Cancer Research UK over £2.5 millioncenter_img The first online auction to source office supplies delivered 30% savings to the charity. The auction to source IT hardware including desktops and laptops saved Cancer Research UK a further 20%, and another 33% was saved via the auction for laboratory consumables and equipment such as chemicals, plastics and personal protection equipment. Through the latter auction, the charity also managed to reduce its number of suppliers from over 200 to fewer than six. Belinda Turner, Procurement Director at Cancer Research UK said: “Initially, there was some scepticism that online auctions could deliver such huge savings. Now with three projects under our belts, we are convinced that this approach is extremely valuable.“We are now developing a more holistic approach across all our procurement – this is not about centralising procurement, rather about sharing best practice with our individual buyers and helping them to buy more cost effectively.” Peter Garnett, Managing Director at Aria Insite, said: “The auctions are only successful because Vendigital follows rigorous processes before, during and after the actual events. This process involves supplier headhunting, managing supplier participation, running the auction event, final assessments of suppliers with the best prices through to ensuring the successful implementation with the chosen suppliers.” Tagged with: Digital Research / statistics Cancer Research UK has saved over £2.5 million per annum through a series of online auctions to purchase office supplies, IT hardware and laboratory consumables. The charity has worked with procurement consultants Aria Insite since December 2004 to improve the way it manages its procurement budget, which in 2005/6 was £130 million. Following a detailed spend analysis across all of its UK laboratories, Cancer Research UK and Aria identified the range of items that would be most suited to an online auction. Aria then brought in Vendigital, a specialist procurement company with particular expertise in online auctions, to manage the full auction process from end to end. Advertisementlast_img read more

City of London Corporation calls on firms & individuals to support tsunami appeal

first_img  135 total views,  1 views today Tagged with: disaster London AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis8 The City of London Corporation is encouraging City firms and individuals to donate to Save the Children’s Indonesia Tsunami Appeal after it gave £30,000.Over 420 people died and more than 1,000 people were injured in the tsunami that struck the coastal towns of Sundra Strait in Indonesia on 22 December after the AnakKrakatau volcano erupted. Over 880 homes have been destroyed, leaving over 16,000 people displaced.The money given to Save the Children UK for the appeal will support the charity’s staff on the ground setting up an urgent response, distributing temporary shelter, providing families with essential hygiene and offering psychological support to children to overcome the distressing experience. The donation comes from the City Corporation’s Disaster Relief Fund, which seeks to relieve human suffering. It has now given £170,000 to good causes in the last two years, including £25,000 towards the We Love Manchester Appeal following the devastating terror attack in the city and £40,000 to the Disasters Emergency Committee’s 2018 Indonesia Tsunami Appeal.Jeremy Mayhew, Chairman of City of London Corporation’s Finance Committee, said:“These tsunamis are devastating for Indonesia. So many people have lost their lives, communities have been torn apart and livelihoods have been destroyed. We are strongly encouraging City firms to support this appeal. Save the Children is focusing its support on the families who have been deeply affected and left very vulnerable. The charity is playing a vital role in the humanitarian response and addressing the psychological distress that the victims will experience.” Melanie May | 14 January 2019 | News City of London Corporation calls on firms & individuals to support tsunami appeal  136 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis8 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

Protesters fight Scott Walker’s anti-worker platform

first_imgHundreds of activists participated in the “Oppose Scott Walker’s Wall Street Agenda” protest July 13 at the Waukesha County Expo Center, where Wisconsin Gov. Walker officially announced he’s running for U.S. president. Beside the workers who make it run, the suburb of Waukesha near Milwaukee is a virtually all-white, right-wing, anti-union nest of racist politicians, bankers and bosses.The day before Walker announced his candidacy, he signed the 2015-17 state budget. It contains possibly the worst austerity measures for poor and working people in state history. The attacks in the 157-page budget pushed by Walker and the right-wing Legislature include elimination of the state’s prevailing wage; $250 million in cuts to the University of Wisconsin System; evisceration of tenure via state statute; and gutting many environmental state agencies and programs. It also requires drug testing for FoodShare participants and codifies a wide range of attacks on women’s reproductive freedom and on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer communities.The legislation is a continuation of union-busting Act 10 rammed through in 2011 and the implementation of the right-to-work-for-less law signed on March 9. Walker’s ongoing pro-Wall Street program has resulted in a plummeting standard of living for poor and working people in Wisconsin, especially people of color.However, statewide people’s resistance has opposed Walker’s austerity program of racist union-busting, privatization, deregulation and attacks on women and LGBTQ communities — ever since he became governor on Jan. 1, 2011. To date, the high point of people’s resistance occurred when thousands of labor, community, student, other progressive and faith-based forces occupied the state Capitol in February and March 2011 to oppose union-busting Act 10.Fight racist union-busting austerityThe Waukesha protesters showed the world that people’s resistance is alive in Wisconsin. They also appealed to all poor and working people to reject Walker’s program, which the governor intends to implement countrywide if elected president.The Wisconsin Bail Out the People Movement called on people to join the July 13 protest with their union-community signs, banners and ”some noise,” as they continue to resist Walker’s reactionary program — or to protest in their cities if they couldn’t make it to Waukesha.The WBOPM flier stressed, “Since his election as governor, Walker — on behalf of big business and the banks — has waged unrelenting war on all poor and working people with the evisceration of a variety of progressive laws won in people’s struggles over the decades. Only a mass mobilization of all the people of Wisconsin and nationwide can stop and reverse the many attacks on us. We can and must tell those bankers, corporate bosses and their paid flunkey politicians “No more!” We say no to Scott Walker for president!” (tinyurl.com/njoeuor)The protest’s comprehensive list of demands called for an end to police killings and jailing killer cops and emphasized that Black, Brown, Native and LGBTQ lives matter. Included was insistence on legalization for all immigrants. A crucial point called for attacks to stop on the disabled, women, seniors, children and youth. Also tax and mortgage foreclosures must be stopped and Hardest Hit Homeowners funds must be used to keep people in their homes.Other strong, pro-worker demands were for repealing Act 10 and right-to-work-for-less laws; an end to union-busting, pension, wage and benefit cuts and for a living wage for all. While calling for an end to the destruction of public schools and universities, activists asserted that public education is a right and should be fully funded — instead of the government paying for prisons and wars. Protesters also demanded public lighting, expansion of public transit, free health care for all and an end to environmental dangers.A diverse array of individuals and organizations urged people to protest Walker, his reactionary political cronies and his imperialist backers on July 13. These included the Coalition For Justice, the Latin American Solidarity Committee, the Milwaukee County Labor Council, Queers Against Scott Walker and Voces de la Frontera.For more information see www.wibailoutpeople.org.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

HIT Tax will Hit Farmers Hard

first_img SHARE HIT Tax will Hit Farmers Hard Home Indiana Agriculture News HIT Tax will Hit Farmers Hard By Gary Truitt – Nov 4, 2016 Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter SHARE HIT Tax will Hit Farmers HardPat Wolff, American Farm Bureau Tax AdviserThe federal government is about to raise your taxes and increase your cost of health insurance. Beginning in 2018, farmers and small businesses will have to start paying the Health Insurance Tax.  The tax was created by the Affordable Care Act to help pay for the legislation. Congress voted last year to impose a one-year delay of the tax until 2018. AFBF tax specialist Pat Wolff says the tax would increase the cost of insurance for farmers and ranchers, “Farmers have two issues with health insurance: one is how much it costs, and the other is, is it available in rural areas? The HIT tax comes straight to how much does insurance cost. It raises the cost of health insurance and it makes it harder for people who have to buy their own insurance to pay for insurance or to upgrade and get higher quality coverage.”Wolff says the tax is imposed on insurance companies based on the premiums they collect, but the companies pass the cost along to their customers, “The insurance companies just pass this along to people who have to buy their own health insurance to the tune of about $500 per family per year, and that’s a lot of money for farmers and ranchers.”Wolff says small business owners, along with farmers and ranchers, need tax certainty and security of additional relief from the tax, “You shouldn’t collect in 2017, you shouldn’t collect it in 2018, or 2019, or ever. There’s a wide range of small business groups who are pushing for repeal of the HIT, and they’ve called on Congress to act when they get back after the election to make sure that there isn’t just a one year moratorium, that the repeal of the HIT goes on for more than one year.” Previous articleNo Shakeup Expected on Senate Ag CommitteeNext articleISDA Invests in Soil Conservation Division Gary Truittlast_img read more

Senators Urge Department-Wide USDA Initiative to Prioritize Farm Bill Water Quality…

first_img SHARE U.S. Senators Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), Ranking Member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, and Joni Ernst (R-Iowa), Chairman of the Subcommittee on Rural Development and Energy, led a bipartisan letter urging U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Sonny Perdue to utilize a department-wide National Water Quality Initiative to prioritize conservation measures in the 2018 Farm Bill to address water quality.“The 2018 Farm Bill made historic investments in voluntary conservation efforts to address water quality challenges—from the Great Lakes to the Chesapeake Bay to the Mississippi River,” wrote the Senators. “Specifically, the bill reformed and improved all major conservation programs in order to provide new tools to assist farmers, ranchers, and landowners in addressing water quality concerns.”“We know farmers play an important role as stewards of our land and water,” the Senators went on to write. “In order to maximize the effectiveness of these water quality improvements, we urge you to implement these provisions through a department-wide National Water Quality Initiative, which would build off the existing initiative housed at the Natural Resource Conservation Service.”In addition to requesting the creation of the new initiative, the Senators also provided recommendations for coordinating implementation of the new water quality priorities to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the Farm Bill’s conservation investments.The letter, led by Senators Stabenow and Ernst, was also signed by Sens. Mike Braun (R-Ind.), Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), Tom Carper (D-Del.), Bob Casey (D-Pa.), and Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa). Facebook Twitter Senators Urge Department-Wide USDA Initiative to Prioritize Farm Bill Water Quality Improvements Home Indiana Agriculture News Senators Urge Department-Wide USDA Initiative to Prioritize Farm Bill Water Quality Improvements Facebook Twitter By Hoosier Ag Today – Apr 17, 2019 SHARE Previous articleU.S., Japan to Accelerate Trade Talks Towards AgreementNext articleTrump Responds to No Ag in EU Talks, Threatens Tariffs Hoosier Ag Todaylast_img read more